M8

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4.5 in M8 rocket diagram.jpg
M8
Unguided RocketType
USA CountryIcon USA.pngCountry of origin
Production History
Picatinny ArsenalDesigner
1941 - 1944Produced
Specifications
38 lb (17 kg)Missile mass
33 in (840 mm)Length (normal)
4.5 in (110.0 cm)Diameter (normal)
TNTExplosive warhead
4.8 lb (2.0 kg)Explosive mass
Other Information
4,600 yd (4.6 km)Maximum firing range
600 mph (970 km/h)Speed
NoneGuidance System

Description

Side view of an M8 4.75 inch unguided rocket.


The 4.5-inch (110 mm) M8 fin-stabilized rocket is approximately 33 in (0.83 m) in length and 40 lb (18.1 kg) and is almost an equivalent of a 105 mm Shell M1. This rocket utilises an M4 fuze which explodes after a 0.015-sec delay set off by auxiliary M1 booster.

The components of the rocket break down into three separate sections, the fuze, shell and motor body. The shell of the rocket or the head is made up of a warhead body fitted with a burster tube. The burster tube itself extends from the shell through the rocket body and through the rocket motor, the purpose of this is to expand the explosive capability of the rocket by utilising the rocket motor as an additional source of fragmentation in the explosion. Once fired, folding fins around the tail flange will extend and spin stabilise the rocket.

The M8 rocket requires a tube launcher to launch (as opposed to being installed directly to external hardpoints) and this accomplished by mounting an M10 cluster launcher to the underside of the aircraft’s wings or fuselage belly. The M10 is a cluster of three 10-foot tubes manufactured from plastic (M14s are made from steel and M15s are constructed of magnesium alloy) and are banded together in six places and are secured to the aircraft via two mounting straps, front and rear. The rear strap also bears the electrical connections which link up to the rockets once in the tubes as the firing links. The release and contact mechanisms are protected from flying links and fired casings ejected from the wing guns to prevent accidental damage or drop release of the M10 launcher.

Vehicles equipped with this weapon

Vehicles equipped with this weapon
Fighters  P-39N-0 Airacobra · P-39Q-5 Airacobra · P-47D-28 Thunderbolt · P-51D-5 Mustang · Wetmore's P-51D-10 Mustang · P-51D-20-NA Mustang · P-51D-30 Mustang · P-51H-5-NA
Twin-engine fighters  P-38G-1 Lightning · XP-38G · P-38J-15 Lightning · Richard Bong's P-38J-15 Lightning
Attackers  A-20G-25 Havoc
Ships  Higgins 78 ft PT-200

General info

Tell us about the tactical and technical characteristics of the bomb.

A soldier holding an M8 rocket prior to loading in a launch tube.

Effective damage

The M8 rocket is a 40 lb (18.1 kg) high explosive mass with a TNT warhead which travels at 600 mph (970 km/h). After slamming into a target a slight delay will set off the explosive mass of the missile causing the TNT shell to detonate along with fragmenting the rocket body and motor. Damage is caused by both the high explosives and fragmentation.

Comparison with analogues

Give a comparative description of bombs that have firepower equal to these type of weapons.

Usage in battles

The M8 rockets are typically mounted on an aircraft in groups of three (usually two launchers of three) or a total of 16 on the boat Higgins 78 ft PT-200. The M8 rocket is typically best utilised against personnel, installations and light armoured vehicles due to the fantastic fragmentation of this rocket upon impact and explosion.

Pros and cons

Pros:

  • Lightweight, able to mount on fighter aircraft
  • Can be used against bombers

Cons:

  • Inaccurate, best fired in groups to increase the chance of hitting a target
  • Increases aerodynamic drag, decreasing flight efficiency

History

Examine the history of the creation and combat usage of this weapon. If the historical reference turns out to be too big, take it to a separate article, taking a link to an article about the vehicle and adding a block "/ History" (example: https://wiki.warthunder.com/(weapon-name)/History) and add a link to it here using the main template. Be sure to reference text and sources by using <ref>, as well as adding them at the end of the article.

Media

  • Image of ground crew member adjusting M8 rocket launch tubes under the wing of an A-20G-25.
  • Crew members loading M8 rocket tubes under the wing of an P-47D in Saipan, 1944.
  • An M8 rocket with its stablising fins out (right) and an M16 rocket (left).
  • An A-20G-25 firing off an M8 rocket from an M10 Bazooka tube launcher.
  • A P-39Q-5 firing off an M8 rocket from an underwing M10 Bazooka tube launcher.

See also

Links to the articles on the War Thunder Wiki that you think will be useful for the reader, for example:

  • reference to the article about the variant of the weapon;
  • references to approximate analogues by other nations and research trees.

External links


Rockets
USA 
70 mm  FFAR Mighty Mouse
110 mm  M8
127 mm  HVAR
298 mm  Tiny Tim
Germany 
55 mm  R4M
73 mm  RZ.65
88 mm  Pb2
150 mm  Wgr.41 Spr
210 mm  Wfr.Gr.21
USSR 
55 mm  S-5K · S-5M · S-21
82 mm  M-8 · RS-82 · RBS-82
88 mm  S-8KO
132 mm  M13 · RS-132 · RBS-132
240 mm  S-24
245 mm  TT-250
Britain 
76 mm  RP-3 · AP Mk.I · AP Mk.II
Japan 
Type 3  Type 3 No.1 · Type 3 No.6
Type 5  Type 5 No.1 · Type 5 No.6
France 
37 mm  SNEB 37
68 mm  SNEB Type 23 · TDA 68 mm
127 mm  T10 121
HE-FRAG  T10 140
HE  T10 151

Naval special armaments
USA  Mortar: Mk 2
  Rockets: Mk.7 · M8 · 7.2 in T37
USSR  Mortar: RBM · RBU-2500
  Rockets: M-8 · M13 · BM-14-17