USS Texas

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VTOL | Rank 5 USA
AV-8A Harrier Pack
us_battleship_texas.png
GarageImage USS Texas.jpg
USS Texas
AB RB SB
6.7 6.7 6.7
Class:
Research:380 000 Specs-Card-Exp.png
Purchase:990 000 Specs-Card-Lion.png
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Description

The USS Texas was a New York-class battleship. Built as the first ship of her class, even before the lead ship USS New York, she was built by Newport News Shipbuilding shipyard and laid down on 17th April 1911 and commissioned on 12th March 1914. USS Texas was the first in many things for the US Navy, including the first to carry 14-inch (356 mm) guns, the first to mount anti-aircraft guns, the first to be able to launch aircraft, the first to control gunfire with directors and range keepers, and one of the first to receive a production radar. She is also the last surviving dreadnought-style battleship, conserved as a museum ship in dry-dock in Galveston, Texas.

Her armament consisted of five turrets each armed with a pair of 14-inch/45 Mark 12 cannons, with two turrets on the bow, one amidships and the last two astern. Secondary armament was made up of six 5 inch Mark 7 (127 mm) cannons in casemates with 3 on each side of hull. Short range anti-aircraft battery is supplied with a total of forty-four Oerlikon Mk. II 20 mm autocannons in various positions all over the ship, while medium-range defence is made up of ten quadruple Bofors L/60 Mark 2 cannons. Long-range anti-air protection is made up of ten 3-inch/50 Mk.10 (76 mm) cannons. USS Texas served in WWI in Europe without seeing any action. In 1926 she underwent a refit that added torpedo blisters to the side of hull, making it wider. At the beginning of WWII, she patrolled the Atlantic until returning to United States in 1941. In 1942, she would return to the Atlantic and then the Mediterranean as part of task force supporting Operation Torch. During the North African landings, she conducted two fire support missions bombarding Vichy French positions. Until D-Day in 1944, she resumed escorting convoys. She supported the Omaha beach landing and Rangers attacking Pointe du Hoc. After the capture of France, she left to the Pacific to take part in the Battle of Iwo Jima and Okinawa. She was placed in reserve on 18th June 1946. She became a museum ship in 1948.

New York-class, USS Texas (BB-35), 1945 was introduced in Update "Sons of Attila" as the third 14-inch US Navy battleship. Unlike Arizona, she possesses less firepower due to having only ten guns instead of twelve found on Arizona. As a WWI-era coal-powered dreadnought, USS Texas is quite slow and sluggish. Her magazines, although at the waterline, are protected by 305 mm thick belt armour which is sufficient protection against most long-range shells coming in at an angle. As USS Texas is in her 1945 refit, she has an anti-air search radar at her disposal, giving information about incoming threats from afar and with her large battery of medium and light autocannons ready to deal with any threat.

General info

Survivability and armour

Armourfront / side / back
Citadel279 / 305 / 70 mm
Main fire tower356 / 229 / 229 mm
Hull25 mm (steel)
Superstructure16 mm (steel)
Number of section9
Displacement32 000 t
Crew1 810 people

Being the last of the US Navy dreadnoughts before USS Nevada introduced the "all-or-nothing" armour scheme, USS Texas uses the older distributed armour scheme. Compared to the other US battleships at her rank, this means she has both a thinner and narrower main belt than both the USS Nevada and USS Arizona, with a 12-inch belt. This is still greater than the earlier Delaware and Wyoming-class battleships, but the belt doesn't cover nearly as extensive an area. It quickly falls off to 9 inches of armour covering the majority of the hull, ending slightly below the secondary battery with 6.5 inches of armour plating. While this is beneficial when fighting light cruisers and below, this does allow strong heavy cruisers and battleships to still quite easily punch through the belt at typical ranges; the armour only serving to trigger the fuse on armour-piercing shells. Overall, this armour scheme is better for fighting cruisers, but compared to contemporary rank battleships like the Nevada it will be worse off in a battleship duel.

As is standard for US battleships, the main-battery turrets are still well armoured, though not to the extreme extent of the later battleships. A 14-inch plate, angled at 26 degrees serves as the main protection, and should protect from all but the most powerful battleship guns at point blank range; more than adequate enough for 99 percent of engagements. The sides and rear of the turrets however fall down to 8 inches, capable of being penetrated by nearly every cruiser. Captains should remember to keep their turrets oriented towards the majority of threats, as being shot from these angles will easily disable them. The top is well protected from plunging fire with a 5.75-inch plate, and the barbettes are reasonably armoured with 12 inches of armour covering the majority, although there are some sections fore and aft with only 10 inches. The deck has a complicated, multilayer layout. The upper layer ranges from 1.75 inches to 2.75 inches in thickness, and serves to trigger the fuse on plunging shells or AP bombs. The second layer then ranges from 1-inch to 1.5 inches of armour, and should stop any explosive damage or splinters from reaching the magazines or the engine room. The magazines are positioned mostly below the waterline, but as with other American battleships, a small amount does protrude over the waterline; captains should attempt to make this difficult to hit.

Finally, the USS Texas is in her 1945 refit, and therefore has access to torpedo bulges. These will absorb up to 250 kg warheads, the same as other US battleships. This should protect from most torpedo drops, although a few select torpedoes like those found on the PT-810 or, of course, anything with the Long Lance will blow past this protection, and usually only one or two of these are lethal. Captains should not rely on this torpedo protection, and instead should attempt to avoid torpedoes as much as possible; if a torpedo hit is inevitable, avoid a hit near the magazines if at all possible.

Mobility

Speedforward / back
AB44 / 13 km/h
RB38 / 11 km/h

USS Texas as designed was intended to hit 21.0 kn at flank speed, similar to that of other US Navy battleships at the time. Over time, this would fall incredibly slightly to 20.5 kn with the extra weight of the torpedo bulges, armour and anti-aircraft guns. This places her squarely between the USS Arizona which is still in its prewar refit and USS Nevada, the current slowest US battleship. It takes Texas approximately 40 seconds to attain this speed and 50 seconds to come to a halt. Just like with other battleships, Texas has a wide turning circle, and whilst doing so her speed falls to only 14.0 kn. It also takes her quite some time to respond to the helm, approximately 4-5 seconds passing before she actually begins the turn. Captains should be wary of this tendency when attempting to traverse congested waters, as it is exceedingly easy to run aground when attempting to do so. Another quirk of the Texas is that similar to the Arizona, her bow does like to swing back around in the opposite direction after turning, so some slight rudder usage might be necessary to keep the bow in the intended direction.

Mobility Characteristics
Game Mode Upgrade Status Maximum Speed (km/h) Turn Time (s) Turn Radius (m)
Forward Reverse
AB Stock ___ ___
Upgraded 44 13
RB/SB Stock ___ ___
Upgraded 38 11

Modifications and economy

Repair costBasic → Reference
AB26 310 → 33 045 Sl icon.png
RB32 365 → 40 650 Sl icon.png
Total cost of modifications297 000 Rp icon.png
454 000 Sl icon.png
Talisman cost2 300 Ge icon.png
Crew training280 000 Sl icon.png
Experts990 000 Sl icon.png
Aces2 000 Ge icon.png
Research Aces830 000 Rp icon.png
Reward for battleAB / RB / SB
450 / 600 / 100 % Sl icon.png
208 / 208 / 208 % Rp icon.png
Modifications
Seakeeping Unsinkability Firepower
Mods new ship hull.png
Dry-Docking
Research:
12 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
18 000 Sl icon.png
240 Ge icon.png
Mods new ship rudder.png
Rudder Replacement
Research:
22 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
34 000 Sl icon.png
440 Ge icon.png
Mods new ship screw.png
Propeller Replacement
Research:
15 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
23 000 Sl icon.png
300 Ge icon.png
Mods new ship engine.png
Engine Maintenance
Research:
32 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
49 000 Sl icon.png
640 Ge icon.png
Mods ship damage control crew.png
Damage Control Division
Research:
12 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
18 000 Sl icon.png
240 Ge icon.png
Mods ship fire control crew.png
Fire Division
Research:
22 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
34 000 Sl icon.png
440 Ge icon.png
Mods ship anti fragmentation protection.png
Shrapnel Protection
Research:
15 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
23 000 Sl icon.png
300 Ge icon.png
Mods ship venting.png
Ventilation
Research:
15 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
23 000 Sl icon.png
300 Ge icon.png
Mods new ship pumps.png
New Pumps
Research:
32 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
49 000 Sl icon.png
640 Ge icon.png
Mods ship ammo wetting.png
Ammo Wetting
Research:
32 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
49 000 Sl icon.png
640 Ge icon.png
Mods new aa caliber turrets.png
Anti-Air Armament Targeting
Research:
12 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
18 000 Sl icon.png
240 Ge icon.png
Mods tank ammo.png
356mm_us_45_mk8_navy_apcbc_ammo_pack
Research:
12 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
18 000 Sl icon.png
240 Ge icon.png
Mods tank ammo.png
127mm_usa_51_ap_ammo_pack
Research:
12 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
18 000 Sl icon.png
240 Ge icon.png
Mods new aux caliber turrets.png
Auxiliary Armament Targeting
Research:
22 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
34 000 Sl icon.png
440 Ge icon.png
Mods new main caliber turrets.png
Primary Armament Targeting
Research:
15 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
23 000 Sl icon.png
300 Ge icon.png
Mods ship rangefinder.png
Improved Rangefinder
Research:
15 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
23 000 Sl icon.png
300 Ge icon.png

Armament

Primary armament

5 х Turret2 x 14 inch/45 Mk.12 cannon
Ammunition240 rounds
Vertical guidance-5° / 15°

The commissioning of the New York class introduced the 14" (356 mm) gun as the most powerful naval cannon in the world until the British commissioned the first of the Queen Elizabeth class ships later that year, and was still quite formidable even by the end of WW2. Mounted in five double turrets, there is a measure of resiliency by less loss of firepower from a disabled turret.

Only armour-piercing and high-explosive shells are available for the ship. The HE shells are decidedly mediocre for the calibre in terms of explosive filler, but the AP shells have a very respectable level of penetration for a high tier ship, especially as the range increases.

Penetration statistics
Ammunition Type of
warhead
Penetration @ 0° Angle of Attack (mm)
1,000 m 2,500 m 5,000 m 7,500 m 10,000 m 15,000 m
Mk.9 HE HE 71 71 71 71 71 71
Mk.8 APCBC APCBC 637 597 536 484 439 372
Shell details
Ammunition Type of
warhead
Velocity
(m/s)
Projectile
mass (kg)
Fuse delay
(s)
Fuse sensitivity
(mm)
Explosive mass
(TNT equivalent) (kg)
Ricochet
0% 50% 100%
Mk.9 HE HE 823 635 0 0.1 46.67 79° 80° 81°
Mk.8 APCBC APCBC 823 635 0.035 17 15.24 48° 63° 71°

Secondary armament

6 х Turret5 inch/51 Mk.7 cannon
Ammunition230 rounds

Some ships are fitted with weapons of various calibres. Secondary armaments are defined as weapons chosen with the control Select secondary weapon. Evaluate the secondary armaments and give advice on how to use them. Describe the ammunition available for the secondary armament. Provide recommendations on how to use them and which ammunition to choose. Remember that any anti-air armament, even heavy calibre weapons, belong in the next section. If there is no secondary armament, remove this section.

Penetration statistics
Ammunition Type of
warhead
Penetration @ 0° Angle of Attack (mm)
1,000 m 2,500 m 5,000 m 7,500 m 10,000 m 15,000 m
Mk.15 common Common 114 94 68 50 38 26
5 inch APC APC 191 157 115 84 64 44
Shell details
Ammunition Type of
warhead
Velocity
(m/s)
Projectile
mass (kg)
Fuse delay
(s)
Fuse sensitivity
(mm)
Explosive mass
(TNT equivalent) (g)
Ricochet
0% 50% 100%
Mk.15 common Common 960 22.68 0.005 6 780 47° 60° 65°
5 inch APC APC 960 22.68 0.015 5 770 48° 63° 71°

Anti-aircraft armament

10 х Turret3-inch/50 Mk.10 cannon
Ammunition200 rounds
10 х Turret4 x 40 mm Bofors L/60 Mark 2 gun
Ammunition8000 rounds
Belt capacity4 rounds
Fire rate156 shots/min
44 х Turret20 mm/70 Oerlikon Mk.II autocannon
Ammunition1800 rounds
Belt capacity60 rounds
Fire rate450 shots/min

An important part of the ship's armament responsible for air defence. Anti-aircraft armament is defined by the weapon chosen with the control Select anti-aircraft weapons. Talk about the ship's anti-air cannons and machine guns, the number of guns and their positions, their effective range, and about their overall effectiveness – including against surface targets. If there are no anti-aircraft armaments, remove this section.

Usage in battles

In ship-to-ship combat, the Texas will be similar to the USS Nevada and USS Arizona, which struggle against the latest battlecruisers and battleships; all three are at least 20 years older and the technology differences shows. What Texas will excel at is AAA cover, with its excellent AAA quantity and quality, assisted by radar to spot incoming threats. Try to stay near friendly ships to protect them against aerial threats and any small torpedo boats trying to sneak in.

Pros and cons

Pros:

  • 10 x 14" (356 mm) main guns
  • 5 individual turrets
  • Massive number of AA guns
  • Aerial search and tracking radars
  • Resistant to HE shells

Cons:

  • Armour weak against AP shells
  • Sluggish manoeuvring
  • No dual purpose 127 mm, heavy AA is limited to the 76 mm guns.
  • 14" rounds weaker compared to other newer types

History

The USS Texas is truly "The First and the Last". Although ordered after the USS New York (BB-34), construction started, was finished, and commissioned into the US Navy two months ahead. At commissioning she was the first capital ship in world to mount 14" cannons and the first US Navy "super dreadnought". This was just a start! USS Texas lists of Firsts in the US Navy:

  • Anti-Air gun installation, 3" on top of the ship cranes; August 1916
  • Test "kite balloon" in mid 1918
  • Test feasibility of carrying exposed aircraft across ocean 20 October - 4 November 1918 (platforms installed by British Royal Navy at Jarrow Slake, England).
  • First to launch aircraft; 11 March 1919
  • First to mount radar; Late 1938
  • First US warship to be decommissioned and become a permanent museum

Finally

  • The Last Dreadnought style battleship left afloat in the world.

USS Texas served in the US Navy an extraordinarily long time even before becoming a museum, was a witness to monumental changes in human history. Some key dates compared to events in Texas history to illustrate world events.

17 April 1911: construction of what will be USS Texas (BB-35), began.

15 April 1912: the RMS Titanic sank, a tragic event still discussed today.

18 May 1912: Just 33 days after the Titanic tragedy the USS Texas is launched into the water.

12 March 1914: USS Texas is commissioned into the US Navy, the most powerful warship in the world.

28 July 1914: A month following the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, Europe erupts into World War One.

6 April 1917: After years of avoiding it, the United States is drawn into the war.

11 November 1918: "The war to end all wars" concludes.

6 February 1922: The "Washington Naval Treaty" was signed, a ten year moratorium on battleship construction however allowed upgrades.

31 July 1925: Instead of the original plan to scrap, due to the treaty the plans changed to a massive modernization of the USS Texas.

23 November 1926: Effectively a new ship, the Texas one again became the USN Flagship.

Approximately 1935: With rising geopolitical tensions, the anticipated decommissioning was once again postponed.

1 September 1939: World War 2 begins.

6 and 9 August 1945: Two atomic bombs dropped on Japan, heralding the nuclear age.

14 October 1947: The Bell X-1 was first aircraft to officially break the sound barrier.

21 April 1948: USS Texas is officially decommissioned, ownership transferred to the State of Texas and becoming a permanent museum.

30 April 1948: her name was struck from the Naval Vessel Register.

13 December 1988 to 8 September 1990: USS Texas was dry docked and underwent extensive restoration before reopening.

31 August 2022: USS Texas began a second, more extensive restoration project requiring replacement of corroded torpedo budges.

Media

Skins
Videos

See also

External links


Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co.
Gun Destroyers (DD) 
Clemson-class  USS Welborn C. Wood · HMS Churchill*
Heavy Cruisers (CA) 
Des Moines-class  USS Newport News
Battleships (BB) 
New York-class  USS Texas
New Mexico-class  USS Mississippi
  *USS Herndon in UK service

USA battleships
Delaware-class  USS North Dakota
Wyoming-class  USS Wyoming · USS Arkansas
New York-class  USS Texas
Nevada-class  USS Nevada
Pennsylvania-class  USS Arizona
New Mexico-class  USS Mississippi