T-62

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Arcade Realistic Simulator

Arcade Realistic Simulator

Arcade Realistic Simulator

General info

The T-62 in the garage.

The T-62 is a Rank VI Russian medium tank with a battle rating of 8.3 (AB/RB/SB). It was introduced in Update 1.61 "Road to Glory". The T-62 is a further development of the T-54 series and was made to fight the newer NATO tanks. It features a 115 mm U-5TS smoothbore gun, which makes the T-62 the first tank in-game and in real life to use a smoothbore gun. The gun also introduces the Armour-Piercing Discarding-Sabot Fin-Stabilized (APDS-FS) into the game.

The main purpose, usage and tactics recommendations

General play style

Vehicle characteristics

Tactics

Specific enemies worth noting

Counter-tactics

Pros and cons

Pros:

  • High-velocity 115 mm gun
  • Excellent penetration of 440mm at all ranges with HEATFS
  • Better frontal hull armour than T-54
  • Flatter turret profile than T-54

Cons:

  • Rather limited gun elevation/depression
  • Long reload time
  • Vulnerable side flat 80 mm armour
  • No anti-air defense
  • Longer profile than the T-54s
  • Stock APFSDS shells have underwhelming penetration values

Specifications

Arcade Realistic Simulator

Arcade Realistic Simulator

Arcade Realistic Simulator

Armaments

1 x 115 mm U-5TS cannon (40 Rounds)
1 x 7.62 mm SGMT machine gun (2,500 Rounds)

Main armament

1 x 115 mm U-5TS cannon
  • Ammunition Capacity: 40 Shells
  • Gun Depression: -6°
  • Gun Elevation: 16°
  • Turret Rotation Speed: 9.5°/s (Stock), _._°/s (Upgraded), _._°/s (Prior + Full Crew), _._°/s (Prior + Expert Qualif.), _._°/s (Prior + Ace Qualif.)
  • Rate of Fire: 15.6s (Stock), __._s (Full Crew), __._s (Prior + Expert Qualif.), __._s (Prior + Ace Qualif.)
1 x 115 mm U-5TS cannon
  • Ammunition Capacity: 40 Shells
  • Gun Depression: -6°
  • Gun Elevation: 16°
  • Turret Rotation Speed: 9.5°/s (Stock), _._°/s (Upgraded), _._°/s (Prior + Full Crew), _._°/s (Prior + Expert Qualif.), _._°/s (Prior + Ace Qualif.)
  • Rate of Fire: 15.6s (Stock), __._s (Full Crew), __._s (Prior + Expert Qualif.), __._s (Prior + Ace Qualif.)
1 x 115 mm U-5TS cannon
  • Ammunition Capacity: 40 Shells
  • Gun Depression: -6°
  • Gun Elevation: 16°
  • Turret Rotation Speed: 9.5°/s (Stock), _._°/s (Upgraded), _._°/s (Prior + Full Crew), _._°/s (Prior + Expert Qualif.), _._°/s (Prior + Ace Qualif.)
  • Rate of Fire: 15.6s (Stock), __._s (Full Crew), __._s (Prior + Expert Qualif.), __._s (Prior + Ace Qualif.)
Ammunition
Ammunition Penetration in mm @ 0° Angle of Attack Type of
warhead
Velocity
in m/s
Projectile
Mass in kg
Fuse delay
in m:
Fuse sensitivity
in mm:
Explosive Mass in
TNT equivalent
in g:
Normalization At 30°
from horizontal:
Ricochet:
10m 100m 500m 1000m 1500m 2000m 0% 50% 100%
3BM4 295 291 278 250 237 200 APFSDS 1615 5.6 N/A N/A N/A +1.5° 72° 73° 75°
3BM3 350 347 322 300 283 270 APFSDS 1615 5.6 N/A N/A N/A +1.5° 76° 77° 78°
3BK4 440 440 440 440 440 440 HEATFS 950 13 0.0 0.1 2,510 +0° 65° 72° 75°
3OF11 31 31 31 31 31 31 HE 905 15 0.1 0.5 2,640 +0° 79° 80° 81°
Ammo racks
Full
ammo
1st
rack empty
2nd
rack empty
3rd
rack empty
4th
rack empty
5th
rack empty
Recommendations Visual
discrepancy
40 39 (+1) 19 (+21) 18 (+22) 17 (+23) (+39) Turret empty: 39 (+1)
One rack only: 17 (+23)
No

Secondary armament

1 x 7.62 mm SGMT machine gun (coaxial)

Crew

  • Commander
  • Gunner
  • Loader
  • Driver

Total: 4 Crew members

Armour

Armour type:

  • Rolled homogeneous armour (Hull)
  • Cast homogeneous armour (Turret)
Armour Front (Slope angle) Sides Rear (Slope angle) Roof
Hull 100 mm (60°) Front glacis
100 mm (55°) Lower glacis
80 mm 45 mm (1-2°) Upper
20 mm (54°) Lower
30 mm
Turret 214 mm (0-26°) Turret front
240 mm Gun mantlet
115 - 214 mm (~26°) 65 mm (10-28°) 60 mm Boundary
30 mm Center
Armour Sides Roof
Cupola 40 mm 40 mm

Notes:

  • Suspension wheels and tracks are 20 mm thick.

Engine & mobility

Weight: 37.0 ton

Max Speed: 56 km/h
Stock

  • Engine Power: 899 hp @ 2000 rpm
  • Power-to-Weight Ratio: 24.30 hp/ton
  • Maximum Inclination: 27°

Upgraded

  • Engine Power: ___ hp @ 2000 rpm
  • Power-to-Weight Ratio: __.__ hp/ton
  • Maximum Inclination: __°
Weight: 37.0 ton

Max Speed: 50 km/h
Stock

  • Engine Power: 513 hp @ 2000 rpm
  • Power-to-Weight Ratio: 13.86 hp/ton
  • Maximum Inclination: 30°

Upgraded

  • Engine Power: ___ hp @ 2000 rpm
  • Power-to-Weight Ratio: __.__ hp/ton
  • Maximum Inclination: __°
Weight: 37.0 ton

Max Speed: 50 km/h
Stock

  • Engine Power: 513 hp @ 2000 rpm
  • Power-to-Weight Ratio: 13.86 hp/ton
  • Maximum Inclination: 30°

Upgraded

  • Engine Power: ___ hp @ 2000 rpm
  • Power-to-Weight Ratio: __.__ hp/ton
  • Maximum Inclination: __°

Modules and improvements

Tier Mobility Protection Firepower
I Tracks Parts Horizontal drive
II Suspension, Brake system FPE Adjustment of fire, 3BM3
III Filters Crew replenishment Elevation mechanism
IV Transmission, Engine ESS Artillery support, 3BK4

History of creation and combat usage

Development

In the late 1950s, the Soviets realize that the 100 mm gun on the T-54/55 series is no longer able to penetrate the newer NATO tanks from a long distance, examples being the Centurion and M48 Pattons. It was decided to upgrade the gun for better performance with kinetic penetrators, shifting towards a 115 mm caliber gun that fires sabot rounds. Unfortunately, the T-54/5 tank turrets were not large enough to hold the bigger gun, so a new tank was put into development. It used design characteristics from the T-54, but with a larger hull and turret to make room for the gun and its recoil.

The first prototype was labeled Object 140 by an engineer named Leonid N. Kartsev, famous for designing many modernized variants of the T-54. His Object 140 uses a 100 mm D-54TS gun on a two-plane gun stabilizer and two were built at Uralvagonzavod in 1957. The design proved too complicated and expensive to produce on a large-scale, so development was halted for the Object 140. Kartsev then started on Object 165 and based its design on the previous T-54, with a lengthened T-54 chassis and a modernized Object 140 turret with a cartridge-case ejector and a redesigned suspension for weight distribution. The tank was built in November 1958 with three prototypes. In 1962, the Soviets accepted Object 165 into service under the designation T-62, with Factory #183 to produce five more for further tests.

During work on Object 165, Kartsev also looked into arming his tanks with a more powerful gun, as the 100 mm D-54TS on his tank and the older 100 mm D-10 on the T-54 were no longer superior to NATO tanks. The 100 mm D-54TS underwent a modification by removing the rifling, muzzle brake, along with lengthening the gun tube, adding an automated case-ejector, adding a bore evacuator, and reducing the bullet chamber profile. This caused the caliber of the 100 mm gun to increase to 115 mm and the new design was labeled as the 115 mm U-5TS "Molot" Rapira. The 115 mm gun proved to be much stronger than the 100 mm D-10, with a 700 km/h faster muzzle velocity with sabot rounds and a doubled maximum range. The downside was the lowered accuracy due to the smoothbore, but the Soviets did not see it as a big issue. This new gun was fitted onto the Object 140 turrets, and the tanks with the guns were labeled Object 166. By 1960, Kartsev's Object 165 and 166 passed the Army trials and serial production was to be set up at Uralvagonzavod. However, the program came under contest with Alexander Marzov's Object 430 tank (the prototype of the T-64). Both Kartsev's and Morozov's tanks were designed in Ural and the Soviets did not see why it should produced two different tank design from the same place. The situation changed with the appearance of the American M60 and rumors that the British were developing a more powerful 120 mm gun for their new standard tank. Marshall Vasily Chuikov, Commander-in-Chief for the Soviet Army, ordered a commission to see which of the two tanks were more suitable for mass production. The commission found that Morozov's Object 430 was only marginally better than the T-54, so focus shifted towards Kartsev's tank as the main battle tank of the Soviet Army. Though Object 165 was the first design to be designated the T-62, the superior armament on the newer Object 166 had the designation switch to the Object 166, while Object 165 got renamed into the T-62A and was discontinued after the five built for evaluations. Ural produced the Object 166 version of the T-62 from July 1961 to 1973 with up to 20,000 tanks produced, though it was licensed and produced by North Korea up until the 1980s. It's estimated that up to 22,700 T-62 tanks were produced in total.

Design

The T-62's internal compartments was of conventional design with driving compartment up front, fighting in the middle, and the engine in the rear. The T-62 used many T-54 parts in order to standardize production. Differences between the T-62 and T-54 include a longer and wider hull, different road wheels, and difference in the gaps between the road wheels, mainly on the last three pairs of road wheels. The T-62 was equipped with a 115 mm U-5TS cannon, the first smoothbore ever mounted on a tank and it had a superiority with muzzle velocity in comparison to the NATO forces. It also was the first gun to use the APDS-FS ammunition, with the fins needed to stabilize the armour-piecing discarding-sabot rounds when fired through an unrifled barrel. The turret design also had an automated case-ejector, which caused empty cartridges from fired shells to be automatically ejected from the turret interior via a small hatch to the rear. The tank also had a two-axis stabilizer that allowed the T-62 to have a 70& probability of hitting a target from 1 km away while the tank was moving 20 km/h. The tank used torsion-bar suspension and a 581 hp V-55 diesel engine, the same one used in the T-55. It could also create a smoke screen with the engine by injecting fuel into the exhaust. Armour protection compared to the T-55 was much tougher on the front, but the side and roof armour on the hull are thinner. A snorkel was available for use on the T-62 in deep wading.

Like the T-54/55, it suffered some of the design's flaws, such as the cramped crew compartments and rather crude gun control systems. The automated ejecting system also disables any NBC protection the tank has due to opening a small hatch to let in contaminated air, but this system could be disabled. The turret rotation is substantially longer at 20 seconds for a full 360° than the 15 seconds on a M60. The T-62 cannot traverse when the driver's hatch is open due to the interruption it presents on the gun. The commander has a turret override but cannot fire from his position, and even then the commander override does not affect gun elevation. The smooth bore gun the T-62 has does not have a greater long-range accuracy than rifled guns. Also, the T-62's greatest flaw was that it was more expensive than the T-54/55, thus causing many nation to not see worth in the T-62 and rather keeping the T-54/55 with upgraded ammunition that eventually matched up to the T-62's 115 mm cannon. The T-62 was also starting to get outmatched by NATO tanks such as the Chieftain and it could not keep up with the BMP-1 infantry-fighting vehicles to conduct combined-arms assaults. These limitations in comparison to the T-54/55 made it unpopular in the international market.

Combat usage

The T-62 entered Soviet service in July 1961 and became one of the most common tanks in Soviet inventory alongside the T-54/55s, the two together made up 80% of Soviet tanks in the 1960s to 70s. The T-62's first combat with the Soviets was in the Sino-Soviet border conflicts in 1969, with one captured by the Chinese in March 15. The captured tank eventually gave the Chinese data to produce their Type 69 main battle tank. The next usage was in Afghanistan during the Soviet invasion from 1979 to 1989. They were used similarly to American tanks in the Vietnam War to assist fire support bases. Though many modernized T-62s with applique armour showed up later in the war, many were downed in Mujaheddin attacks via land mines and RPGs. Many T-62 left behind fell into the hands of the Mujaheddin forces. Past the dissolution of the Soviet Union, the T-62 still saw service in the Russian Federation, though now as reserves due to the appearance of newer and better main battle tanks. The T-62 still saw combat in the War in Chechnya and the 2008 South Ossetia war. As the Cold War never grew hostile, Soviet Union nor Russia used the T-62 against a Western force.

Like the T-54/55, the T-62 was exported to Soviet Union allies, although some countries such as Poland and Czechoslovakia chose not to adopt it due to its minimal upgrade compared to the T-55s. The first to order the T-62 in large numbers was Bulgaria, buying 250 tanks that were delivered from 1970 to 1975. The Middle East also received a large amount of T-62s, mainly to Egypt, Syria, and Iraq. Egypt and Syria used T-62 in large numbers in the 1973 Yom Kippur war against Israel, where it faced off against the M60 Pattons and Centurions armed with 105 mm guns. Israel manages to capture hundreds of the T-62 tanks from Syria, and even put some to use as the Tiran-3. Israel also exported several of the captured T-62s to Latin America and even to America and Germany for evaluations. Cuba also ordered T-62s, with the first arriving in 1976 with about 500 units total during the delivery period. Angola also ordered T-62s in the 1980s for use in their civil war. Up to 175 T-62s arrived in Angola by 1985. Other conflicts the T-62 is known to be in is the Chadian-Libyan conflict in 1982, the Ethiopian Civil War, the Iran-Iraq War, and the First Gulf War.

Screenshots and fan art

Skins and camouflages for the _____ from live.warthunder.com.

Additional information (links)

[Devblog] T-62: In Keeping With Tradition

References


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ussr_t_62.png

Icon-country-sov.png T-62
Nation USSR
Type Medium tank
Rank 6
Battle Rating
8.3
8.3
8.3

   Metric✓       Imperial   

   Metric       Imperial✓   

Characteristics
Weight
37,000 kg
81,571 lb
Number of Crew 4
Hull armour thickness
100/80/45/30 mm
3.94/3.15/1.77/1.18 inches
Statistics
Engine power (stock)
899 hp
513 hp
513 hp
Engine power (upgraded)
___ hp
580 hp
580 hp
HP/ton ratio (stock)
24.30
24.69
13.86
14.09
13.86
14.09
HP/ton ratio (Upgraded)
__.__
__.__
15.68
15.93
15.68
15.93
Max speed
56 km/h
35 mph
50 km/h
31 mph
50 km/h
31 mph
Main Weapon
1 x 115 mm U-5TS Cannon
Ammo stowage 40 rounds
Vertical guidance -6°/16°
Secondary Weapon
1 x 7.62 mm SGMT Machine gun
Ammo stowage 2,500 rounds
Mount Coaxial
Economy
Required RP 380,000 RP
Vehicle cost 990,000 SL
Crew training cost 280,000 SL
Max repair cost*
5,000 SL
4,600 SL
5,100 SL
Free repair time (Stock)
7d
10d
10d
Free repair time (Upgraded)
_d __h
_d __h
_d __h
Warning: this sidebar is a WIP, and can be incorrect. Last updated 1.79.1.125.