World War One!

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With the strides forward towards the modern era, one should always look back and appreciate the genesis of the technology that brought forth everything that exists in the game today. World War One brought forth the first instances of tank and aerial warfare, and the influences back in the era can be seen in the designs in World War II. With this, we are also introducing a new range of battle ratings, you’ll be pleased to hear that 0.0-1.0 will be allocated to these new vehicles that fought a century ago!

Due to the nature of the belligerents of World War One, we will introduce this concept for three nations: Germany, Great Britain, and France. In future, we hope to include the United States, Russian Empire, Italy, and the Japanese into the fray to complete the global conflict of World War One.

Germany

Aviation

Fokker Eindecker E.III

The legendary Fokker Eindecker is one of the earliest monoplanes ever developed and used for combat. It is also one of the earliest planes to use a synchronized machine gun as part of its armament. Being one of the first dedicated fighter aircraft with a forward-facing machine gun, the Eindecker allowed the Germans to achieve a period of aerial superiority, which was named the “Fokker Scourge” by the Entente. The main version of the Eindecker that allowed the German pilots to take the skies was the Fokker E.III.

Seeing service in December 1915, the Eindecker with its single IMG 08 machine gun firing through the propellor can prove a threat to many aircraft, with the 100 hp Oberursel U.1 propelling it through the skies. Though the single 7.92 mm machine gun may not seem like much in the War Thunder skies, the fabric and wood constructions make the machine gun a devastating weapon against the delicate surfaces.

Contest the skies and make your opponents feel like Fokker fodder!

Specifications
Armaments

  • 1 x 7.92 mm IMG 08 machine guns (500 rpg)

Engine

  • Name: Oberursel U.1 9-cylinder radial
  • Cooling type: Air
  • Power: 100 hp
  • Mass: 287 kg

Stats

  • Max speed: 140 km/h
    • at height: sea level
  • Max altitude: 3,600 m
  • Rate of Climb: 3.33 m/s
  • Takeoff run: 230 m
  • Flight range: 198 km

Albatros D.III

The predominant German fighter plane in World War One, the Albatros D.III was used by many German aces in the Imperial German Luftstreitkräfte, including Manfred von Richthofen, the “Red Baron.” Produced by Albatros-Flugzeugwerke, the biplane Albatross D.III was an improvement D.I and D.II variants, distinguished by a new sesquiplane wing design and V-shaped interplane struts.

The Albatros D.III is known for its maneuverability in the skies, as well as the climb rate towards the right position. However, flaws with the wings hinder the dive ability. Armed with two 7.92 mm machine guns firing through the propellers with a gun synchronizer, the Albatros D.III is adequately armed to deal with its contemporaries.

We hope the Albatros D.III satisfy the World War One blend between the very first fighters to the current reserve He 51 biplane series in German aviation.

Specifications
Armaments

  • 2 x 7.92 mm LMG 08/15 machine guns (500 rpg = 1,000 total)

Engine

  • Name: Mercedes D.IIIa 6-cylinder inline
  • Cooling type: Water
  • Power: 175 hp
  • Mass: 310 kg

Stats

  • Max speed: 175 km/h
    • at height: sea level
  • Max altitude: 5,500 m
  • Rate of Climb: 4.5 m/s
  • Takeoff run: 240 m
  • Flight range: 480 km

Ground

A7V

Unlike their World War II doctrines, the Germans of World War One did not have a great emphasis in tank production. Like their World War II actions, their tanks are large, lumbering, and a major investment of resources. The A7V is an impressive tank by all considerations by its statistics. With a front 57 mm cannon, the rest of the hull is dotted with machine guns to spray all-around.

If compared to the current tanks in War Thunder, the A7V will have the most crew members in any armoured fighting vehicle with 18 crew members. 14 are the gunners and loaders, two for each weapon system on the tank. The rest are the commander, driver, and the two engine operators who maintain the two Daimler-Benz engine. The engine operators, a newly coded crew member by our Mr. Becker, allow for engine repairs and fire extinguishing even without the Parts and FPE modifications as long as they are alive. If they are incapacitated by enemy action or carbon monoxide poisoning, this effect is lost.

We hope the A7V will give new players a good idea of a powerful, but sluggish vehicle can give a rather good impression on how late rank German vehicles will play as against its contemporaries.

Specifications
Armaments

  • 1 x 57 mm Maxim-Nordenfelt cannon (180 Rounds)
  • 6 x 7.92 mm MG08 machine guns (10,000 Rounds)

Crew

  • Commander
  • Gunner
  • Loader
  • Machine gunner x6
  • Machine gun loader x6
  • Driver
  • Engine operator x2

Total: 18 Crew members

Armour

Armour Front (Slope angle) Sides (Slope angle) Rear (Slope angle) Roof
Hull 30 mm 15 mm 15 mm 6 mm
Armour Front Sides Rear Roof
Cupola 20 mm 15 mm 15 mm 5 mm

Engine & mobility

  • Weight: 33.0 ton
  • Max Speed: 15 km/h
  • Engine Power: 200 hp @ 1800 rpm
  • Power-to-Weight Ratio: 6.06 hp/ton

Naval

G101-class Destroyer

Originally an order for Argentina, four destroyers were completed at the shipyards of Germaniawerft and Schichau-Werke. However, when World War One broke out in 1914, the Germans seized the ships and placed them into the Kaiserliche Marine service. The four destroyers were known as the G101-class, each destroyer named in succeeding numbers from G101 to G104.

Though originally armed with Argentina’s specifications of four 102 mm guns and six 533 mm torpedoes, the Germans modified this with domestic weapons of four 88 mm guns and six 500 mm torpedoes, as well as 24 mines. Though armed with a significant amount of fire power, the lack of anti-aircraft firepower and huge profile (about 95.3 meters long!) makes taking care of this destroyer a chore even in World War One waters.

In the waters of War Thunder, the steady care of this beast can bring a powerful stick to wave about in the seas.

Specifications

  • Crew: 104
  • Length: 95.3 meters
  • Displacement: 1,734 tons
  • Speed: 33.5 knots
  • Range: 2,420 nautical miles

Armaments

  • 4 × 88 mm SK L/45 naval guns
  • 6 × 500 mm torpedoes

Great Britain

Aviation

Airco DH.2

Even before the Mosquito, Geoffrey de Havilland had made significant contributions to British aviation. During his employment at Airco, he designed many aircrafts, characterized with his initials “DH”. During World War One, the British Royal Flying Corps sought for a fighter aircraft that can contest the German “Fokker Scourge”. Geoffrey de Havilland took his two-seat DH.1 design and scaled it down into a one-seat fighter variant. This revised design was known as the DH.2 and first flew in July 1915.

The DH.2 allowed the British pilots to wage battle against the Fokker Eindecker. A single Lewis machine gun was available for the pilot to use in front of him, clear of any propellor blades with the DH.2 pusher design with the propellor behind the fuselage “pushing” the plane forwards. This engine configuration gave the plane great maneuverability, but also a tendency to stall as well.

The DH.2 provides the basic essentials for a pilot to start dog fighting those flying Fokkers!

Specifications
Armaments

  • 1 x 7.7 mm Lewis machine gun (47 rpg)

Engine

  • Name: Gnôme Monosoupape 9 Type B 9-cylinder radial
  • Cooling type: Air
  • Power: 100 hp
  • Mass: 137 kg

Stats

  • Max speed: 150 km/h
    • at height: sea level
  • Max altitude: 4,265 m
  • Rate of Climb: 2.77 m/s
  • Takeoff run: 248 m
  • Flight range: 400 km

Sopwith Camel

The British Royal Flying Corps held the air with their Sopwith Pup biplanes, however this was outclassed by new German planes in 1916. As such, the Sopwith Pup was to be replaced with a new design by the Sopwith Aviation Company. The new plane had a look of a bulkier Sopwith Pup and was given a nickname “Big Pup”, however a metal sheet shape over the machine guns gave an impression of a hump and the name Camel stuck with the new design, even if the name was not used officially.

Compared with the Pup, the Camel has two machine guns and a more powerful engine. The Sopwith Camel was very maneuverable in the air as well, though this and other design flaws led to very difficult handling for the pilots, leading to many accidents with novices. However, these characteristics leveled the Sopwith design with its contemporaries, becoming the main fighter for the Royal Flying Corps and later in a ground-attack role by mounting Cooper bombs under the fuselage.

Swing around with the Albatros or bomb the ground to oblivion, the Camel can live to its namesake as a rather reliable beast once tamed.

Specifications
Armaments

  • 2 x 7.7 mm Vickers machine guns (250 rpg = 500 total)
  • 4 x 20 lb Cooper bombs

Engine

  • Name: Clerget 9B 9-cylinder radial
  • Cooling type: Air
  • Power: 130 hp
  • Mass: 173 kg

Stats

  • Max speed: 182 km/h
    • at height: sea level
  • Max altitude: 5,791 m
  • Rate of Climb: 5.5 m/s
  • Takeoff run: 227 m
  • Flight range: 485 km

Ground

Mark V

One of the most common requested World War One vehicle is the landship. We suspect that the FT isn’t as loved after the experience that is the French reserve tanks, but when people view this tank, it sounded like “What we took the A1E1 Independent and made it better and more classical?” Well say no more when the Mark V rolls over the muddy trench that you play War Thunder in to grind your way to Rank VI during the stagnant tactic that is trench warfare for the last four years!

Upgraded from the early marks, the Mark V had more armour and also a more powerful engine to make the overall vehicle more mobile than its predecessors. The “male” version of tanks were armed with two 6-pounder cannons along with machine guns, while “female” versions had only machine gun sponsons. However, many were modified to house at least one 6-pounder cannon in response to German armor such as the A7V and beutepanzer, captured tanks in German service.

An iconic beast of its age, the old ironclad can once again roam the mud, hunting down hapless players in their trenches from all sides.

Specifications
Armaments

  • 2 x QF 6 pounder 6 cwt Mk I cannons (207 Rounds)
  • 4 x 7.7 mm Hotchkiss Mk 1 machine guns (4,000 Rounds)

Crew

  • Commander
  • Gunner x 6
  • Driver

Total: 8 Crew members

Armour

Armour Front (Slope angle) Sides (Slope angle) Rear (Slope angle) Roof
Hull 16 mm 12 mm 12 mm 8 mm

Engine & mobility

  • Weight: 29.0 ton
  • Max Speed: 8.0 km/h
  • Engine Power: 150 hp @ 1200 rpm
  • Power-to-Weight Ratio: 5.17 hp/ton

Naval

Acasta-class destroyer

The British Royal Navy’s build-up program in the naval arms race against Germany produced many new and stronger ships over the years via different Fleet Acts and Naval Programme. In Britain’s Naval Programme of 1911-1912, new destroyers were produced to make them larger and more heavily armed than its predecessors. Taken over from the Acorn and Acheron classes, the Acastas-class that was about 25% heavier with more firepower at hand.

Twenty destroyers of the Acastas-class would be produced from 1911-1912, twelve were built to the admiralty’s specifications, and eight were builder’s special that had a shorter hull and displaced less. All were armed with a mixed weapon base, three 4-inch QF naval guns with one 2-pounder “pom-pom” guns for anti-aircraft purpose. Two tubes for 21-inch torpedoes were also available for the destroyer to use. The Acastas would serve well into World War One, including the Battle of Jutland where four were sunk in the largest naval battle of World War One.

The Acastas surely has its capabilities to survive on the War Thunder waters against its contemporaries with its “jack-of-all-trade” characteristics and diverse weapons.

Specifications

  • Crew: 77
  • Length: 81.5 meters
  • Displacement: 984 tons
  • Speed: 32.0 knots
  • Range: 1,540 nautical miles

Armaments

  • 3 × QF 4-inch L/40 Mark IV guns
  • 1 × QF 2 pdr pom-pom Mk.II autocannon
  • 2 × 21-inch torpedoes


France

Aviation

Nieuport 11

With the contest of the skies in World War One, the desire to compete against the Fokker Eindeckers brought forth the biplane design to outmaneuver the competitors. Taking elements from a competition racing model, the Nieuport 10, the Société Anonyme des Etablissements Nieuport company got to work in making this a military vehicle. Characterized by the sesquiplane wing design and V-shaped struts, the Nieuport 11 remained one of the Entente's most capable fighters throughout the war.

The Nieuport's performance can easily outclass the German Eindeckers with its speed, rate of climb, and maneuverability. Its performance high in the skies make it valuable as a scout aircraft and also a fighter. Though fitted with a single unsynchronized machine gun, the Nieuport can also be fitted with eight Le Prieur rockets, some of the first rockets mounted onto aircraft. Though inaccurate, these rockets can be devastating against balloon targets. Serving not only France, but many countries in the war such as Britain, Russia, Italy, Belgium, and Romania, the Nieuport 11 has quite a reputation for the Entente's air force.

Live up the Nieuport's influential aircraft designs soon!

Specifications
Armaments

  • 1 x 7.7 mm Lewis machine gun (97 rpg)
  • 8 x Le Prieur rockets

Engine

  • Name: Le Rhône 9C 9-cylinder radial
  • Cooling type: Air
  • Power: 80 hp
  • Mass: 121 kg

Stats

  • Max speed: 156 km/h
    • at height: sea level
  • Max altitude: 4,600 m
  • Rate of Climb: 3.33 m/s
  • Takeoff run: 227 m
  • Flight range: 330 km

SPAD S.XIII

The French Aéronautique Militaire with the SPAD S.VII had an excellent aircraft flying about when it was adopted in August 1916. However, new German aircrafts like the Albatros series outclassed this fighter and a call was sent for a better plane, more speed was needed. The 150 hp Hispano-Suiza 8Aa engine was replaced with a 200 hp 8Ba engine, this power allowed the SPAD design to succeed as the SPAD S.XIII.

With two Vickers machine gun mounted, the SPAD S.XIII provided sufficient firepower for the aircraft. With its new engine, the S.XII had more speed and a faster rate of climb, but its construction exhibit poor maneuverability compared to its contemporaries. Nevertheless, the characteristics made the SPAD S.XIII a favorable aircraft for not only the French, but the British and Americans as well.

With its favorable characteristics, we hope the experience spading the SPAD will be an ace!

Specifications
Armaments

  • 2 x 7.7 mm Vickers machine guns (400 rpg = 800 total)

Engine

  • Name: Hispano-Suiza 8Ba 8-cylinder inline
  • Cooling type: Water
  • Power: 200 hp
  • Mass: 236 kg

Stats

  • Max speed: 218 km/h
    • at height: sea level
  • Max altitude: 6,650 m
  • Rate of Climb: 6.67 m/s
  • Takeoff run: 205 m
  • Flight range: 276 km

Ground

Renault FT

As the first production tank with a rotating turret, it would not be too far a stretch to say the Renault FT had its influences in every tank seen in War Thunder.

Designed by Louis Renault of the Société des Automobiles Renault company, the FT tank was envisioned as lightweight vehicle so the engine can adequately power the vehicle. With its adoption in 1917, the French military envisioned the FT as a “swarm” over the battlefield, preferring the many light tanks compared to the few heavy tanks. This job was realized with the French industry able to pump out 2,697 tanks before the November Armistice.

Putting this tank next to the current French reserve tanks, it wouldn’t seem to out of place as its elements impacted French tank development during the interwar period. The 37 mm SA 1918 gun of the Hotchkiss H.35 and FCM.36 originated from the FT. The two-man crew of French tank designs also stemmed from the FT. With this familiarity from current designs in War Thunder, the Renault FT is no stranger to the French ground forces!

Discover the origin of the turreted tanks with the FT!

Specifications
Armaments

  • 1 x 37 mm SA18 L/21 cannon (240 Rounds)

Crew

  • Commander
  • Driver

Total: 2 Crew members

Armour

Armour Front (Slope angle) Sides Rear Roof
Hull 16 mm 16 mm 16 mm 8 mm
Turret 22 mm Turret front
16 mm Gun mantlet
22 mm (12-28°) 22 mm (37°) 22 mm

Engine & mobility

  • Weight: 6.5 ton
  • Max Speed: 10.0 km/h
  • Engine Power: 39 hp @ 1500 rpm
  • Power-to-Weight Ratio: 6.00 hp/ton

Naval

Spahi-class destroyer

Possible alternatives: Arquebuse, Bouclier, Arabe

Witnessing the other nations advance in naval construction, the French issued plans for 450 ton destroyers to catch up. Seven vessels came to fruit from this program, in what is known as the Spahi-class destroyers.

The Spahi-class was certainly larger than its predecessors, but also more well armed with the naval guns and torpedoes. Though the Spahi’s long-range escort capabilities is still subpar, that characteristic is irrelevant to its usefulness at in-game waters. Its small size at only 65.8 meters long with sufficient weaponry makes the Spahi a sneaky boat with the cost of a slower speed.

Reinvent naval warfare with the Spahi-class destroyer!

Specifications

  • Crew: 79
  • Length: 65.8 meters
  • Displacement: 539 tons
  • Speed: 28.0 knots
  • Range: 1,500 nautical miles

Armaments

  • 6 × 65 mm Modèle 1902 guns
  • 3 × 450 mm torpedoes

Additional Links

See Also

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