USS North Dakota

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Merkava Mk.2D Pack
USS North Dakota
us_battleship_north_dakota.png
GarageImage USS North Dakota.jpg
USS North Dakota
AB RB SB
6.3 6.3 6.3
Class:
Research:320 000 Specs-Card-Exp.png
Purchase:790 000 Specs-Card-Lion.png
Show in game

Description

The Delaware-class, USS North Dakota (BB-29), 1919 is a rank V American battleship with a battle rating of 6.3 (AB/RB/SB). It was introduced in Update "New Power".

General info

Survivability and armour

Armourfront / side / back
Citadel254 / 279 / 38 mm
Main fire tower305 / 203 / 203 mm
Hull25 mm (steel)
Superstructure16 mm (steel)
Number of section9
Displacement22 400 t
Crew1 384 people

The North Dakota has pretty average armour for a dreadnought. The 279 mm main armour belt and the coal bunkers behind it are more than enough to keep out shells from cruisers, but AP shells from other battleships will punch right through and cause damage to important modules inside the ship. The turrets have thick front armour, but the sides and rear are mediocre and the barbettes are only 254 mm thick and aren't covered by the main belt or coal bunkers. The deck armour ranges from 38 to 51 mm, but will rarely be hit due to how low in the ship it is and the close range of combat in-game. The crew count of 1,384 men is higher than most ships in the game except for ships with large AA complements, meaning that the ship can sustain heavy fire and remain operational. Unfortunately, this ship has one fatal flaw: the ammunition storage sticks out above the waterline and is protected only by the 279 mm armour belt, leaving it easily destroyed by other battleships' armour-piercing shells.

Mobility

Speedforward / back
AB46 / 21 km/h
RB40 / 18 km/h

The North Dakota is fairly average in terms battleship mobility, reaching 34 km/h stock and 40 km/h spaded. Capturing points and reaching advantageous locations will take a while. The rudder shift time and acceleration are somewhat sluggish, and the ship struggles to manoeuvre evasively. Unless threats and obstacles like torpedoes and islands are spotted well in advance, dodging them will be very difficult.

Mobility Characteristics
Game Mode Upgrade Status Maximum Speed (km/h) Turn Time (s) Turn Radius (m)
Forward Reverse
AB Stock ___ ___
Upgraded 46 21
RB/SB Stock ___ ___
Upgraded 40 18

Modifications and economy

Repair costBasic → Reference
AB20 000 → 25 120 Sl icon.png
RB34 000 → 42 704 Sl icon.png
Total cost of modifications284 000 Rp icon.png
422 000 Sl icon.png
Talisman cost2 200 Ge icon.png
Crew training230 000 Sl icon.png
Experts790 000 Sl icon.png
Aces1 800 Ge icon.png
Research Aces780 000 Rp icon.png
Reward for battleAB / RB / SB
450 / 600 / 100 % Sl icon.png
202 / 202 / 202 % Rp icon.png
Modifications
Seakeeping Unsinkability Firepower
Mods new ship hull.png
Dry-Docking
Research:
11 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
16 000 Sl icon.png
210 Ge icon.png
Mods new ship rudder.png
Rudder Replacement
Research:
22 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
33 000 Sl icon.png
430 Ge icon.png
Mods new ship screw.png
Propeller Replacement
Research:
14 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
21 000 Sl icon.png
270 Ge icon.png
Mods new ship engine.png
Engine Maintenance
Research:
31 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
46 000 Sl icon.png
600 Ge icon.png
Mods ship tool kit.png
Tool Set
Research:
11 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
16 000 Sl icon.png
210 Ge icon.png
Mods manual ship extinguisher.png
Fire Protection System
Research:
22 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
33 000 Sl icon.png
430 Ge icon.png
Mods ship anti fragmentation protection.png
Shrapnel Protection
Research:
14 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
21 000 Sl icon.png
270 Ge icon.png
Mods ship venting.png
Ventilation
Research:
14 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
21 000 Sl icon.png
270 Ge icon.png
Mods new ship pumps.png
New Pumps
Research:
31 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
46 000 Sl icon.png
600 Ge icon.png
Mods ship ammo wetting.png
Ammo Wetting
Research:
31 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
46 000 Sl icon.png
600 Ge icon.png
Mods new aa caliber turrets.png
Anti-Air Armament Targeting
Research:
11 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
16 000 Sl icon.png
210 Ge icon.png
Mod arrow 0.png
Mods he frag base fuse tank.png
305mm_us_45_mk15_navy_apc_ammo_pack
Research:
11 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
16 000 Sl icon.png
210 Ge icon.png
Mods tank ammo.png
127mm_usa_50_apc_ammo_pack
Research:
11 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
16 000 Sl icon.png
210 Ge icon.png
Mods new aux caliber turrets.png
Auxiliary Armament Targeting
Research:
22 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
33 000 Sl icon.png
430 Ge icon.png
Mod arrow 0.png
Mods new main caliber turrets.png
Primary Armament Targeting
Research:
14 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
21 000 Sl icon.png
270 Ge icon.png
Mods ship rangefinder.png
Improved Rangefinder
Research:
14 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
21 000 Sl icon.png
270 Ge icon.png

Armament

Primary armament

5 х Turret2 x 12-inch/45 Mk.5 cannon
Ammunition200 rounds
Vertical guidance-5° / 15°
  • 10 x 12-inch/45 Mk.5 cannons

The 12-inch/45 Mk.5 makes up North Dakota's main armament, mounted in five twin turrets. The 305 mm cannons come with an ammunition choice of HE (stock) or APCBC unlocked at tier 1. The HE shell hits hard with 33.25 kg of TNT equivalent, and will demolish destroyers and larger ships' superstructures in a handful of salvoes, although this is a relatively low amount of explosive filler compared to the shells of the top battleships. Against other battleships and heavily armoured cruisers, the AP ammunition is the better choice. The AP shell can punch through 501 mm of armour at 1,000 m, and 264 mm at 10 km with 11.78 kg of TNT equivalent. This allows for the penetration of the ammunition storage of both cruisers and other battleships, instantly destroying the enemy, although this doesn't happen often and you may find yourself putting dozens of shells into an opponent in return for little damage dealt. The guns have a stock reload of 39 seconds and a 30-second reload time with maximum skills and an ace crew.

Penetration statistics
Ammunition Type of
warhead
Penetration @ 0° Angle of Attack (mm)
1,000 m 2,500 m 5,000 m 7,500 m 10,000 m 15,000 m
12-inch Cl.B HE HE 68 68 68 68 68 68
12-inch Mk.7 APCBC APCBC 501 447 371 311 264 204
Shell details
Ammunition Type of
warhead
Velocity
(m/s)
Projectile
mass (kg)
Fuse delay
(s)
Fuse sensitivity
(mm)
Explosive mass
(TNT equivalent) (kg)
Ricochet
0% 50% 100%
12-inch Cl.B HE HE 823 335.65 0 0.1 33.25 79° 80° 81°
12-inch Mk.7 APCBC APCBC 823 394.6 0.035 17 11.78 48° 63° 71°

Secondary armament

14 х Turret5-inch/50 Mk.5 cannon
Ammunition240 rounds
  • 14 x 5-inch/45 Mk.5 cannons (7 per side)

The 127 mm cannons come with Common shells stock and an APC round as a tier I modification. Both shell choices have a measly HE filler and mediocre penetration, and the guns fire at a lacklustre 7 rounds a minute. The best use of these guns is to destroy small PT boats at close range or get some extra damage on destroyers or cruisers between main gun salvoes.

Anti-aircraft armament

2 х Turret3-inch/50 Mk.10 cannon
Ammunition200 rounds
  • 2 x 3-inch/50 Mk.10 cannons (1 per side)

These guns make up the North Dakota's anti-air battery. They are mounted amidships and rather high up. These guns provide very little defence, with a small range, only two guns, a long reload time (for an AA gun), and only time-fused shells.

Additional armament

Setup 112 x 533 mm Bliss-Leavitt Mk.1 torpedo

The USS North Dakota possesses two 533 mm Bliss-Leavitt Mk.1 Launchers with 6 torpedoes each, making up a total of 12 torpedoes available to fire. These torpedoes are very poor, being designed before World War One. With a short 3.66 km run distance and only 50 km/h speed, hits will be very rare with these weapons. If by some miracle one of these torpedoes does connect to a target, the small 91 kg warhead will deal minimal damage. You're best leaving them behind, since the chance of being crippled by your torpedoes exploding is much higher than the chance of destroying an opponent with them.

Usage in battles

Your main goal as a battleship (dreadnaught) in Realistic battles that also include "Naval EC" is to fight and control the battlefield with your high-calibre shells, mainly targeting heavy cruisers and battleships, which will be seriously damaged by good AP hits. It is not advisable to shoot at lightly armoured cruisers due to your high penetration armour-piercing shells, as the benefits of doing so is lower than shooting at heavier cruisers and battleships, towards which your shells are similarly effective. However, these rounds will still do major damage to the interior of any ship. Stay near allies that can be helpful with taking down enemies larger than heavy cruisers. It is recommended not to be part of the main force to push into the battlefield, your ship is slower compared to the other ships that you will be fighting, and if a fight goes sour you can easily be overrun and defeated by the enemy due to focus firing while trying to retreat to a more advantageous position.

Stay near friendly ships that can support in the anti-air area, this battleship has very poor anti-air defence capabilities and the little anti-aircraft armament it does receive is two 3-inch guns. With the size and speed of this ship, it is recommended to stay near allies with effective long-range anti-aircraft defences as well as those that can protect you from attack from the air by sheer volume of shells.

Pros and cons

Pros:

  • 5 turrets - losing a turret does not significantly impair your firepower.
  • Decent armour layout
  • High number of secondary cannons

Cons:

  • Slow and unmanoeuvrable
  • Near complete lack of anti-air guns.
  • Long reloads
  • Considered a priority target by opponents due to the high BR and heavy firepower, particularly aircraft

History

USS North Dakota underway, 1912.

USS North Dakota (BB-29) was the second ship of the two-ship Delaware class of dreadnoughts, built for the United States Navy (USN) prior to the start of the First World War. The ships were an improved version of the preceding South Carolina class, and carried a heavy armament of high-calibre cannons all mounted on the centreline. North Dakota never saw combat action due to the neutrality of the United States, and served in a variety of training roles during and after the First World War. She was later converted into a radio-controlled target ship, and scrapped by 1931 in compliance with the London naval treaty.

Design and development

In 1906, HMS Dreadnought was launched, heralding a new type of super-powerful battleships - the dreadnoughts. The dreadnoughts represented a major shift in naval doctrine, as naval architects had come to favour a larger main battery over a smaller main battery coupled with more secondary guns. As a result, the first American dreadnoughts, the South Carolina class, was launched in 1908. This class featured a variety of innovations, the most important being the positioning of the main battery on the centreline in superfiring pairs - this doctrine was subsequently used by the ships of every major nation. The next class, the Delaware class, continued the trend and mounted a fifth turret. As well, the ship had improved mobility over the dreadfully slow South Carolinas, being capable of making 21 knots. The lead ship, Delaware, was launched in 1909, while the North Dakota was actually launched earlier, in November of 1908.

USS North Dakota displaced 22,400 tons at full load, almost 4,000 tons more than the preceding South Carolina class. The ship's complement consisted of 933 officers and men. Main armament consisted of ten 12-inch (305 mm) guns on five twin turrets - two were located forwards of the superstructure in a superfiring pair while three were located aft, one of them facing forwards in a non-superfiring position. The ship's secondary armament consisted of fourteen 5-inch (127 mm) guns in casemate mountings, two 3-pdr 47 mm guns, and four 1-pdr 37 mm anti-aircraft guns. The ship also carried two submerged 21 inch (533 mm) torpedo tubes. Powered by steam turbines delivering 25,000 shaft horsepower, North Dakota was capable of making 21 knots (39 km/h) - this later became the standard for all American battleships.

Operational history

After her commissioning, USS North Dakota fulfilled a variety of training roles and also crossed the Atlantic on her first goodwill voyage to the United Kingdom and France. Following the breakout of war in Europe, North Dakota was assigned to the Atlantic fleet and participated in vigorous training exercises intended to keep sailors ready in the case of an American entry into the First World War. When war was finally declared in 1917, North Dakota remained in the United States, while her sister ship Delaware was sent overseas to fight. As a result, she never saw any active combat. After the end of WWI, North Dakota was used as a training ship for a short period of time before being converted to a radio-controlled target ship. She was eventually scrapped in 1931 after the introduction of the London Naval Treaty.

Devblog

When the British Dreadnought was built, the United States had been completing their own "all-big-guns" battleship, the South Carolina class. Despite the fact that the new ships were not generally inferior to the British competitor, they were criticized for their small hull size and weak auxiliary artillery.

As a result, the Delaware-class battleships were developed during the mid 1900s. Being larger, better armed and more protected than the preceding South Carolinas, the Delaware-class battleships were ordered for construction and laid down in 1907. The two ships of the class, USS Delaware and USS North Dakota, were both commissioned into service with the USN in April 1910. Although sister ships, USS North Dakota featured a different propulsion system than USS Delaware - namely a steam turbine instead of a traditional steam engine.

Both ships saw only limited action, despite serving through the WWI period. While USS Delaware was operating overseas in European waters, USS North Dakota was kept close to the American shoreline due to concerns about its novel propulsion system. Following the end of WWI, both ships mostly continued their peaceful service until the signing of the Washington Naval Treaty in 1922.

Upon the treaty's signing, the Navy's strength was limited, particularly in battleships. As a result, both of the Delaware-class battleships were gradually put out of service during the 1920s while newer battleships were built to replace them. USS Delaware was broken up for scrap in 1924, while USS North Dakota eventually met the same fate in 1931, after serving as a target ship for several years.

Media

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See also

Links to articles on the War Thunder Wiki that you think will be useful for the reader, for example:

  • reference to the series of the ship;
  • links to approximate analogues of other nations and research trees.

External links

References

  • Navy History and Heritage Command. (2019). North Dakota (BB 29). Retrieved January 26, 2021, from https://www.history.navy.mil/our-collections/photography/us-navy-ships/battleships/north-dakota-bb-29.html
Fore River Shipyard
Battleships (BB) 
Delaware-class  USS North Dakota
Note  Fore River Shipyard was purchased by Bethlehem Steel Corp. in 1913.

USA battleships
Delaware-class  USS North Dakota
Wyoming-class  USS Wyoming
Pennsylvania-class  USS Arizona