HMNZS Leander

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HMNZS Leander, 1942
uk_cruiser_leander.png
AB
RB
SB
General characteristics
Brief
Detailed
5.3/5.3/5.3BR
767 peopleCrew
Standard armament
2 x 6 inch/50 BL Mark XXIII cannon4 x Primary
400 roundsAmmunition
2 x 102 mm Mark XIX mounting4 x Secondary
500 roundsAmmunition
20 mm Oerlikon Mk.II cannon5 x Anti-aircraft
1 800 roundsAmmunition
60 roundsBelt capacity
450 shots/minFire rate
4 x 12.7 mm Vickers Mk.V machine gun3 x Anti-aircraft
8 000 roundsAmmunition
200 roundsBelt capacity
600 shots/minFire rate
Additional armament
8 x 533 mm steam turbined Mk.V torpedoSetup 1
Economy
120 000 Rp icon.pngResearch
360 000 Sl icon.pngPurchase
Sl icon.png0/4 830 / 6 279/3 530 / 4 589Repair
100 000 Sl icon.pngCrew training
360 000 Sl icon.pngExperts
1 400 Ge icon.pngAces
x 1.84 Rp icon.pngReward for battle

Description

GarageImage HMNZS Leander.jpg


The HMNZS Leander, 1942 is a rank IV British light cruiser with a battle rating of 5.3 (AB/RB/SB). It was introduced in Update 1.87 "Locked On".

General info

Survivability and armour

Talk about the vehicle's armour. Note the most well-defended and most vulnerable zones, e.g. the ammo magazine. Evaluate the composition of components and assemblies responsible for movement and manoeuvrability. Evaluate the survivability of the primary and secondary armament separately. Don't forget to mention the size of the crew, which plays an important role in fleet mechanics. Save tips for preserving survivability in the "Use in battle" section.

If necessary, use a graphics template to show the most well-protected or most vulnerable points in the armour.

Mobility

Write about the ship’s mobility. Evaluate its power and manoeuvrability, rudder rerouting speed, stopping speed at full tilt, with its maximum forward speed and reverse speed.

Armament

Primary armament

152 mm 6 inch/50 Mark BL XXIII (x8)
Turrets (Bow to stern)
Turret 1 (x2) Turret 2 (x2) Turret 3 (x2) Turret 4 (x2)
Vertical guidance -5°/+60°
Horizontal guidance ±145°
Total ammo capacity 1,600
Ammunition
Penetration statistics
Ammunition Type of
warhead
Penetration in mm @ 0° Angle of Attack
10m 100m 500m 1000m 1500m 2000m
6 inch HE HE 71 62 46 38 36 36
6 inch CPBC SAPBC 203 180 149 124 118 118
Shell details
Ammunition Type of
warhead
Velocity
in m/s
Projectile
Mass in kg
Fuse delay

in m:

Fuse sensitivity

in mm:

Explosive Mass in g
(TNT equivalent):
Normalization At 30°
from horizontal:
Ricochet:
0% 50% 100%
6 inch HE HE 841 50.8 0.0 0.1 3,600 +0° 79° 80° 81°
6 inch CPBC SAPBC 841 50.8 2.5 15 1,700 ° 48° 63° 71°

Secondary armament

102 mm 4 in QF Mark V (x8)
Turrets (Bow to stern)
Front port turret (x2) Front starboard turret (x2) Rear port turret (x2) Rear starboard turret (x2)
Vertical guidance -90°/+80° -80°/+90° ±90°
Horizontal guidance -10°/+80°
Total ammo capacity 2,000
Ammunition
Penetration statistics
Ammunition Type of
warhead
Penetration in mm @ 0° Angle of Attack
10m 100m 500m 1000m 1500m 2000m
102 mm HE HE 71 62 46 38 36 36
102 mm SAP SAPBC 203 180 149 124 118 118
Shell details
Ammunition Type of
warhead
Velocity
in m/s
Projectile
Mass in kg
Fuse delay

in m:

Fuse sensitivity

in mm:

Explosive Mass in g
(TNT equivalent):
Normalization At 30°
from horizontal:
Ricochet:
0% 50% 100%
102 mm HE HE 532 14.06 0.0 0.1 721 +0° 79° 80° 81°
102 mm SAP SAP 728 15.2 1.0 10 520 ° 47° 60° 65°

Anti-aircraft armament

20 mm Oerlikon Mk.II (x5)
Turrets (Bow to stern)
Front turret Middle port turret Middle starboard turret Rear port turret Rear starboard turret
Vertical guidance -5°/+65° -0°/+65°
Horizontal guidance ±180 -60°/+90° -90°/+60° ±180
Total ammo capacity 9,000
12.7 mm Vickers Mk.V (x12)
Turrets (Bow to stern)
Front port turret (x4) Front starboard turret (x4) Rear turret (x4)
Vertical guidance +25°/+75°
Horizontal guidance ±90°
Total ammo capacity 24,000

Torpedo armament

Main article: Mark V
533 mm steam turbined Mk.V torpedo
# on ship Mass (kg) Maximum speed
in water (km/h)
Travel distance (km) Depth stroke (m) Arming
distance (m)
Explosive type Explosive mass (kg)
8 1,736 74 4.57 1.0 50 TNT 305

Usage in battles

Describe the technique of using this ship, the characteristics of her use in a team and tips on strategy. Abstain from writing an entire guide – don’t try to provide a single point of view, but give the reader food for thought. Talk about the most dangerous opponents for this vehicle and provide recommendations on fighting them. If necessary, note the specifics of playing with this vehicle in various modes (AB, RB, SB).

Pros and cons

Summarize and briefly evaluate the vehicle in terms of its characteristics and combat effectiveness. Mark its pros and cons in the bulleted list. Try not to use more than 6 points for each of the characteristics. Avoid using categorical definitions such as "bad", "good" and the like - they have a substitution in the form of softer "inadequate", "effective".

Pros:

Cons:

History

The Leander-class light cruisers were designed in the late 1920s under the influence of the York-class heavy cruisers. However, the Leander-class differed from previous light cruisers by placing a higher emphasis on seaworthiness and operating range, rather than on protection and firepower. This was done with the aim to make the Leander-class light cruisers more suitable for the commerce protection role.

Initially, five ships of the Leander-class were ordered in the early 1930s, with HMS Leader as the lead ship being laid down in September 1930. Leander was completed a year later and commissioned into service in March 1933. Initially, the warship served with the New Zealand Division of the Royal Navy, before being transferred to the Royal New Zealand Navy after its formation in 1941. From there onwards, the ship sailed under its new designation HMNZS Leander.

Leander primarily served in the Pacific theatre during WW2, taking part in several smaller operations during her early service life. Leander was also briefly stationed in the Mediterranean, supporting allied troops in actions against Vichy France during the Syria-Lebanon campaign. After that, Leander once again returned to the Pacific, where she was severely damaged after an engagement with a small Japanese task force in July 1943. The damage suffered from a torpedo hit was so severe that it rendered Leander inoperable for the remainder of the war, until she was repaired in August 1945.

HMNZS Leander only had a very short post-war service life. The warship was officially decommissioned in 1948 and sold for scrap in 1950.

- From Devblog

Media

An excellent addition to the article will be video guides, as well as screenshots from the game and photos.

See also

Links to the articles on the War Thunder Wiki that you think will be useful for the reader, for example:

  • reference to the series of the ship;
  • links to approximate analogues of other nations and research trees.

External links


Britain light cruisers
HMS Enterprise · HMS Dido · HMS Arethusa · HMNZS Leander · HMS Southampton · HMS Tiger