HMNZS Leander

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Italian Fleet
P 420 Sparviero Pack
uk_cruiser_leander.png
GarageImage HMNZS Leander.jpg
HMNZS Leander
AB RB SB
5.3 5.3 5.3
Research:100 000 Specs-Card-Exp.png
Purchase:310 000 Specs-Card-Lion.png
Show in game

Description

The Leander-class, HMNZS Leander, 1942 is a rank IV British light cruiser with a battle rating of 5.3 (AB/RB/SB). It was introduced in Update 1.87 "Locked On".

General info

Survivability and armour

Armourfront / side / back
Citadel25 / 76 / 32 mm
Main fire tower25 / 25 / 25 mm
Hull20 mm (steel)
Superstructure8 mm (steel)
Number of section8
Displacement9 189 t
Crew771 people

Talk about the vehicle's armour. Note the most well-defended and most vulnerable zones, e.g. the ammo magazine. Evaluate the composition of components and assemblies responsible for movement and manoeuvrability. Evaluate the survivability of the primary and secondary armaments separately. Don't forget to mention the size of the crew, which plays an important role in fleet mechanics. Save tips on preserving survivability for the "Usage in battles" section. If necessary, use a graphical template to show the most well-protected or most vulnerable points in the armour.

Mobility

Speedforward / back
AB70 / 30 km/h
RB60 / 26 km/h

Write about the ship's mobility. Evaluate its power and manoeuvrability, rudder rerouting speed, stopping speed at full tilt, with its maximum forward and reverse speed.

Mobility Characteristics
Game Mode Upgrade Status Maximum Speed (km/h) Turn Time (s) Turn Radius (m)
Forward Reverse
AB Stock ___ ___
Upgraded 70 30
RB/SB Stock ___ ___
Upgraded 60 26

Modifications and economy

Repair costBasic → Reference
AB4 500 → 5 850 Sl icon.png
RB6 740 → 8 762 Sl icon.png
Total cost of modifications96 800 Rp icon.png
161 300 Sl icon.png
Talisman cost1 800 Ge icon.png
Crew training90 000 Sl icon.png
Experts310 000 Sl icon.png
Aces1 200 Ge icon.png
Research Aces570 000 Rp icon.png
Reward for battleAB / RB / SB
250 / 290 / 100 % Sl icon.png
178 / 178 / 178 % Rp icon.png
Modifications
Seakeeping Unsinkability Firepower
Mods new ship hull.png
Dry-Docking
Research:
3 700 Rp icon.png
Cost:
6 200 Sl icon.png
240 Ge icon.png
Mods new ship rudder.png
Rudder Replacement
Research:
3 500 Rp icon.png
Cost:
5 800 Sl icon.png
220 Ge icon.png
Mods new ship screw.png
Propeller Replacement
Research:
3 900 Rp icon.png
Cost:
6 500 Sl icon.png
250 Ge icon.png
Mods new ship engine.png
Engine Maintenance
Research:
6 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
10 000 Sl icon.png
380 Ge icon.png
Mods ship tool kit.png
Tool Set
Research:
3 700 Rp icon.png
Cost:
6 200 Sl icon.png
240 Ge icon.png
Mods manual ship extinguisher.png
Fire Protection System
Research:
3 500 Rp icon.png
Cost:
5 800 Sl icon.png
220 Ge icon.png
Mods engine smoke screen system.png
Smokescreen
Research:
3 500 Rp icon.png
Cost:
5 800 Sl icon.png
220 Ge icon.png
Mods ship anti fragmentation protection.png
Shrapnel Protection
Research:
3 900 Rp icon.png
Cost:
6 500 Sl icon.png
250 Ge icon.png
Mods ship venting.png
Ventilation
Research:
3 900 Rp icon.png
Cost:
6 500 Sl icon.png
250 Ge icon.png
Mods new ship pumps.png
New Pumps
Research:
6 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
10 000 Sl icon.png
380 Ge icon.png
Mods ship ammo wetting.png
Ammo Wetting
Research:
6 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
10 000 Sl icon.png
380 Ge icon.png
Mods tank ammo.png
152mm_uk_navy_5_10crh_cpbc_ammo_pack
Research:
3 700 Rp icon.png
Cost:
6 200 Sl icon.png
240 Ge icon.png
Mods tank ammo.png
102mm_uk_mkxvi_navy_SAP_ammo_pack
Research:
3 700 Rp icon.png
Cost:
6 200 Sl icon.png
240 Ge icon.png
Mods new aa caliber turrets.png
Anti-Air Armament Targeting
Research:
3 700 Rp icon.png
Cost:
6 200 Sl icon.png
240 Ge icon.png
Mod arrow 0.png
Mods he frag dist fuse ship.png
152mm_uk_navy_5_10crh_dist_fuse_ammo_pack
Research:
3 500 Rp icon.png
Cost:
5 800 Sl icon.png
220 Ge icon.png
Mods he frag dist fuse ship.png
102mm_uk_mkxvi_navy_he_dist_fuse_ammo_pack
Research:
3 500 Rp icon.png
Cost:
5 800 Sl icon.png
220 Ge icon.png
Mods new aux caliber turrets.png
Auxiliary Armament Targeting
Research:
3 500 Rp icon.png
Cost:
5 800 Sl icon.png
220 Ge icon.png
Mod arrow 0.png
Mods ship rangefinder.png
Improved Rangefinder
Research:
3 900 Rp icon.png
Cost:
6 500 Sl icon.png
250 Ge icon.png
Mods ship rangefinder.png
Improved Rangefinder
Research:
3 900 Rp icon.png
Cost:
6 500 Sl icon.png
250 Ge icon.png
Mods he frag dist fuse ship.png
102mm_uk_mkxvi_navy_he_radio_fuse_ammo_pack
Research:
3 900 Rp icon.png
Cost:
6 500 Sl icon.png
250 Ge icon.png
Mods new main caliber turrets.png
Primary Armament Targeting
Research:
3 900 Rp icon.png
Cost:
6 500 Sl icon.png
250 Ge icon.png
Mods he frag proxi fuze ship.png
152mm_uk_navy_5_10crh_radio_fuse_ammo_pack
Research:
6 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
10 000 Sl icon.png
380 Ge icon.png
Mods torpedo.png
Torpedo Mode
Research:
6 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
10 000 Sl icon.png
380 Ge icon.png

Armament

Primary armament

4 х Turret2 x 6 inch/50 BL Mark XXIII cannon
Ammunition400 rounds
Vertical guidance-5° / 60°
152 mm 6 inch/50 Mark BL XXIII (x8)
Turrets (Bow to stern)
Turret 1 (x2) Turret 2 (x2) Turret 3 (x2) Turret 4 (x2)
Vertical guidance -5°/+60°
Horizontal guidance ±145°
Total ammo capacity 1,600

Ammunition

Penetration statistics
Ammunition Type of
warhead
Penetration @ 0° Angle of Attack (mm)
1,000 m 2,500 m 5,000 m 7,500 m 10,000 m 15,000 m
6 inch HE HE 37 37 37 37 37 37
6 inch CPBC SAPBC 224 194 161 139 125 107
6 inch HE-TF HE-TF 37 37 37 37 37 37
6 inch HE-VT HE-VT 37 37 37 37 37 37
Shell details
Ammunition Type of
warhead
Velocity
(m/s)
Projectile
Mass (kg)
Fuse delay
(m)
Fuse sensitivity
(mm)
Explosive Mass
(TNT equivalent) (g)
Ricochet
0% 50% 100%
6 inch HE HE 841 50.8 0.02 0.1 3,960 79° 80° 81°
6 inch CPBC SAPBC 841 50.8 5.5 7 1,870 48° 63° 71°
6 inch HE-TF HE-TF 841 50.8 0 0.1 3,960 79° 80° 81°
6 inch HE-VT HE-VT 841 50.8 0 0.1 3,960 79° 80° 81°

Secondary armament

4 х Turret2 x 4 inch/45 Mark XVI cannon
Ammunition400 rounds
102 mm 4 inch/45 Mark XVI (x8)
Turrets (Bow to stern)
Front port turret (x2) Front starboard turret (x2) Rear port turret (x2) Rear starboard turret (x2)
Vertical guidance -90°/+80° -80°/+90° ±90°
Horizontal guidance -10°/+80°
Total ammo capacity 2,000

Ammunition

Penetration statistics
Ammunition Type of
warhead
Penetration @ 0° Angle of Attack (mm)
1,000 m 2,500 m 5,000 m 7,500 m 10,000 m 15,000 m
4 inch HE HE 20 20 20 20 20 20
4 inch SAP SAP 101 86 70 60 54 47
4 inch HE-TF HE-TF 20 20 20 20 20 20
4 inch HE-VT HE-VT 20 20 20 20 20 20
Shell details
Ammunition Type of
warhead
Velocity
(m/s)
Projectile
Mass (kg)
Fuse delay
(m)
Fuse sensitivity
(mm)
Explosive Mass
(TNT equivalent) (g)
Ricochet
0% 50% 100%
4 inch HE HE 811 15.88 0 0.1 1,550 79° 80° 81°
4 inch SAP SAP 811 17.35 3 3 600 47° 60° 65°
4 inch HE-TF HE-TF 811 15.88 0 0.1 1,550 79° 80° 81°
4 inch HE-VT HE-VT 811 15.88 0 0.1 1,550 79° 80° 81°

Anti-aircraft armament

5 х Turret20 mm/70 Oerlikon Mk.II autocannon
Ammunition1800 rounds
Belt capacity60 rounds
Fire rate450 shots/min
3 х Turret4 x 12.7 mm Vickers Mk.V machine gun
Ammunition8000 rounds
Belt capacity200 rounds
Fire rate600 shots/min
20 mm Oerlikon Mk.II (x5)
Turrets (Bow to stern)
Front turret Middle port turret Middle starboard turret Rear port turret Rear starboard turret
Vertical guidance -5°/+65° -0°/+65°
Horizontal guidance ±180 -60°/+90° -90°/+60° ±180
Total ammo capacity 9,000
12.7 mm Vickers Mk.V (x12)
Turrets (Bow to stern)
Front port turret (x4) Front starboard turret (x4) Rear turret (x4)
Vertical guidance +25°/+75°
Horizontal guidance ±90°
Total ammo capacity 24,000

Additional armament

Setup 18 x 533 mm steam turbined Mk.V torpedo
Main article: Mk.V (533 mm)
533 mm steam turbined Mk.V torpedo
# on ship Mass (kg) Maximum speed
in water (km/h)
Travel distance (km) Depth stroke (m) Arming
distance (m)
Explosive type Explosive mass (kg)
8 1,736 74 4.57 1.0 50 TNT 305

Usage in battles

Describe the technique of using this ship, the characteristics of her use in a team and tips on strategy. Abstain from writing an entire guide – don't try to provide a single point of view, but give the reader food for thought. Talk about the most dangerous opponents for this vehicle and provide recommendations on fighting them. If necessary, note the specifics of playing with this vehicle in various modes (AB, RB, SB).

Pros and cons

Summarise and briefly evaluate the vehicle in terms of its characteristics and combat effectiveness. Mark its pros and cons in the bulleted list. Try not to use more than 6 points for each of the characteristics. Avoid using categorical definitions such as "bad", "good" and the like - use substitutions with softer forms such as "inadequate" and "effective".

Pros:

Cons:

History

HMNZS Leander (75) underway at sea in 1945.

HMNZS / HMS Leander was the lead ship of the eight-ship Leander class, built in the 1930s as a follow-up to the Emerald (E) class. Influenced by the design of the British County-class heavy cruisers, Leander carried a main armament of eight 6-inch guns in dual turrets. Commissioned in 1933, she served under the New Zealand division of the Royal Navy and was eventually given to the New Zealand Navy in 1941, renamed HMNZS Leander. She served in the Indian Ocean and Mediterranean sea during the early days of the Second World War, primarily as a convoy escort. She later served in the Solomon Islands campaign and was hit by a 610 mm torpedo that put her out of service until the end of the war. Following the cessation of hostilities, Leander was repatriated to the UK, and served with the Mediterranean fleet until she was retired in 1948 and scrapped by 1950.

Design and development

The Leander-class cruisers originated as a successor to the British Emerald (or E) class, as the first class of light cruisers built by the United Kingdom since the end of the First World War. Influenced by the designs of the County and York classes of heavy cruisers, the Leander class had a similar hull design and gun arrangement. However, displacing 7270 tons standard, they were significantly lighter. Leander’s powerful steam turbines allowed her to reach a top speed of almost 33 knots (61 km/h), but their large size meant that she had relatively low armour protection compared to her peers - up to 3 inches (76 mm) of armour at the magazines, and far less throughout the vessel.

Leander carried a main armament of eight 6-inch (152 mm) BL Mk 23 guns mounted in four twin turrets, similar to the layout of the County-class heavy cruisers. She also carried a secondary armament of four single 4-inch (102 mm) dual-purpose guns, though these were upgraded to dual turrets later in her career. Her initial anti-aircraft armament was also rather sparse, composed of just three quadruple Vickers machine guns (calibre 12.7 mm); this was also upgraded significantly in her later service. Leander, the first ship of her class, was laid down in February of 1930; following completion, she was commissioned in 1933.

Operational history

Following her completion, the Leander served in the New Zealand division of the Royal Navy, along with her sister ship Achilles. Back then, the defence of New Zealand’s naval territory was conducted by the Royal Navy, and as a result, the ships were operated by the Royal Navy until the formation of the New Zealand navy in 1941. She participated in the Coronation Review of 1937, and later conducted an aerial survey of the south Pacific ocean. During the time before the war, she toured ports in New Zealand, and also participated in exercises in Australian and British waters.

Following the outbreak of the Second World War, Leander travelled to the port of Alexandria, in the Mediterranean. She was intended to serve in the British mediterranean fleet, but these plans were changed when she was instead given to the British East Indies squadron. During this period, she escorted convoys in the Red sea area and sank several vessels, including an Italian submarine and merchant raider.

In early 1941, Leander was formally given to the New Zealand Navy, which had been formed as an independent naval force. She was then reassigned to the Mediterranean squadron to replace several cruisers that had been destroyed. During this time, she participated in the Syria-Lebanon campaign, fighting against the Vichy French naval forces stationed in that area. After this action, Leander departed as an escort for a convoy bound for Australia, arriving in September of 1941.

In early 1942, with the Japanese raid on Pearl harbour and subsequent declaration of war, Leander began serving in the Pacific theatre. She escorted convoys during the Solomons campaign but was dry docked for several months when a crack was found in her hull. She was returned to service in March of 1943, replacing the sunken cruiser Helena in the Solomon campaign. It was there in July of 1943 when, during a short engagement with Japanese naval forces, Helena was hit by a 610 mm “long lance” torpedo. The damage was extreme, yet she survived and limped to port for repairs. In fact, the damage was extensive enough that she was taken out of service for the rest of the war. By late 1944, Leander had been paid off from the New Zealand Navy, most of her crew members going to her sister ship HMNZS Achilles. Following the completion of repairs, she was repatriated to the UK in late 1945. She saw little service, and was used as a target ship in 1948 before being scrapped by 1950.

Devblog

The Leander-class light cruisers were designed in the late 1920s under the influence of the York-class heavy cruisers. However, the Leander-class differed from previous light cruisers by placing a higher emphasis on seaworthiness and operating range, rather than on protection and firepower. This was done with the aim to make the Leander-class light cruisers more suitable for the commerce protection role.

Initially, five ships of the Leander-class were ordered in the early 1930s, with HMS Leader as the lead ship being laid down in September 1930. Leander was completed a year later and commissioned into service in March 1933. Initially, the warship served with the New Zealand Division of the Royal Navy, before being transferred to the Royal New Zealand Navy after its formation in 1941. From there onwards, the ship sailed under its new designation HMNZS Leander.

Leander primarily served in the Pacific theatre during WW2, taking part in several smaller operations during her early service life. Leander was also briefly stationed in the Mediterranean, supporting allied troops in actions against Vichy France during the Syria-Lebanon campaign. After that, Leander once again returned to the Pacific, where she was severely damaged after an engagement with a small Japanese task force in July 1943. The damage suffered from a torpedo hit was so severe that it rendered Leander inoperable for the remainder of the war, until she was repaired in August 1945.

HMNZS Leander only had a very short post-war service life. The warship was officially decommissioned in 1948 and sold for scrap in 1950.

Media

Excellent additions to the article would be video guides, screenshots from the game, and photos.

See also

Links to articles on the War Thunder Wiki that you think will be useful for the reader, for example:

  • reference to the series of the ship;
  • links to approximate analogues of other nations and research trees.

External links

References:

  • New Zealand History. (2020). HMNZS Leander. Retrieved January 04, 2021, from https://nzhistory.govt.nz/war/hmnzs-leander
  • National Museum of the New Zealand Navy. (2020, June 08). Leander. Retrieved January 07, 2021, from https://navymuseum.co.nz/explore/by-collections/ships/leander/
Britain light cruisers
Emerald-class  HMS Enterprise
Dido-class  HMS Dido
Arethusa-class  HMS Arethusa
Leander-class  HMNZS Leander
Town-class  HMS Belfast · HMS Southampton
Tiger-class  HMS Tiger