Baz

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Rank VII | Premium | Golden Eagles
Challenger DS Pack
f_15a_iaf.png
GarageImage Baz.jpg
Baz
AB RB SB
12.3 12.3 12.3
Research:410 000 Specs-Card-Exp.png
Purchase:1 100 000 Specs-Card-Lion.png
Show in game

Description

In the late 1970s, under the Peace Fox I program, Israel received its first shipment of the latest F-15A Eagle air superiority fighters, and shortly after, the second shipment was temporarily embargoed as a result of the 1982 Lebanon War. However, that did not matter to the Israelis, as even a single F-15 was a landslide advantage in the air wars of the Middle East, making short work of the 30-year-old Syrian MiG-21s that tried to face it. The Israeli F-15A, nicknamed the Baz ("Falcon"), would score the first kill for the F-15 in aerial combat, against a Syrian MiG-21, in 1978, and would start the totem pole of air dominance that defines the F-15's service record. Of the 103+ confirmed aerial kills the F-15 has scored during its service life, Israeli F-15s are responsible for over 80 of them, and the Baz is the concrete starting ground for this long-lasting legacy.

The F-15A Baz, introduced in Update "Air Superiority", is Israel's counterpart to the F-15s found in the American and Japanese tech trees. As a result, the Baz plays almost identically to its Eagle brothers in the other trees, with a few minor differences. The main difference, is that unlike the American and Japanese Eagles, the Baz has access to the Python 3 missile, in addition to the usual selection of AIM-9L and M. The Baz is best played to the same advantages as the other Eagles; do not get too slow, as high-AoA fighters like the JAS39 and the Su-27 will utilize their low speed dogfighting advantages (HMD-slaved missiles and high AoA control) against you. Instead, rely on your own advantages, such as the absurd thrust-to-weight ratio from the powerful engines and the very stable airframe, to set up high-speed engagements in scenarios that favour the Eagle's high speed performance.

General info

Flight performance

Arrestor gear
Accelerates braking by grabbing the brake cable on the deck of the aircraft carrier
Air brakes
Allows you to dramatically reduce the flight speed by releasing special flaps
Max speed
at 10 668 m2 592 km/h
Turn time20 s
Max altitude16 764 m
Engine2 х Pratt & Whitney F100-PW-100
Type
Cooling systemAir
Take-off weight46 t

Describe how the aircraft behaves in the air. Speed, manoeuvrability, acceleration and allowable loads - these are the most important characteristics of the vehicle.

Characteristics Max speed
(km/h at _,___ m)
Max altitude
(metres)
Turn time
(seconds)
Rate of climb
(metres/second)
Take-off run
(metres)
AB RB AB RB AB RB
Stock ___ ___ 16764 __._ __._ __._ __._ 750
Upgraded ___ ___ __._ __._ __._ __._

Details

Features
Combat flaps Take-off flaps Landing flaps Air brakes Arrestor gear Drogue chute
_ _ _ _ _ _
Limits
Wings (km/h) Gear (km/h) Flaps (km/h) Max Static G
Combat Take-off Landing + -
1,629 700 - 548 481 ~__ ~__
Optimal velocities (km/h)
Ailerons Rudder Elevators Radiator
< 680 < 750 < 700 -

Engine performance

Engine Aircraft mass
Engine name Number Basic mass Wing loading (full fuel)
Pratt & Whitney F100-PW-100 2 12,500 kg 314 kg/m2
Engine characteristics Mass with fuel (no weapons load) Max Gross
Weight
Weight (each) Type 10m fuel 20m fuel 30m fuel 34m fuel
1,470 kg Afterburning low-bypass turbofan 14,065 kg 15,528 kg 17,042 kg 17,715 kg 27,718 kg
Maximum engine thrust @ 0 m (RB/SB) Thrust to weight ratio @ 0 m (WEP)
Condition 100% WEP 10m fuel 20m fuel 30m fuel 34m fuel MGW
Stationary 6,140 kgf 8,510 kgf 1.21 1.10 1.00 0.96 0.61
Optimal 7,061 kgf
(1,629 km/h)
13,939 kgf
(1,200 km/h)
1.98 1.80 1.64 1.57 1.01

Survivability and armour

Flares/Chaff
Aircraft countermeasures to distract IR and radar-guided missiles and also AA radar
Crew1 person
Speed of destruction
Structural0 km/h
Gear700 km/h

Examine the survivability of the aircraft. Note how vulnerable the structure is and how secure the pilot is, whether the fuel tanks are armoured, etc. Describe the armour, if there is any, and also mention the vulnerability of other critical aircraft systems.

Modifications and economy

Repair costBasic → Reference
AB2 940 → 4 430 Sl icon.png
RB8 485 → 12 786 Sl icon.png
SB9 991 → 15 056 Sl icon.png
Total cost of modifications314 000 Rp icon.png
475 000 Sl icon.png
Talisman cost3 200 Ge icon.png
Crew training310 000 Sl icon.png
Experts1 100 000 Sl icon.png
Aces3 600 Ge icon.png
Research Aces1 350 000 Rp icon.png
Reward for battleAB / RB / SB
90 / 320 / 500 % Sl icon.png
256 / 256 / 256 % Rp icon.png
Modifications
Flight performance Survivability Weaponry
Mods jet compressor.png
Compressor
Research:
10 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
15 000 Sl icon.png
340 Ge icon.png
Mods booster.png
New boosters
Research:
14 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
21 000 Sl icon.png
470 Ge icon.png
Mods aerodinamic wing.png
Wings repair
Research:
16 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
24 000 Sl icon.png
540 Ge icon.png
Mods jet engine.png
Engine
Research:
26 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
40 000 Sl icon.png
880 Ge icon.png
Mods aerodinamic fuse.png
Fuselage repair
Research:
10 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
15 000 Sl icon.png
340 Ge icon.png
Mods armor frame.png
Airframe
Research:
14 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
21 000 Sl icon.png
470 Ge icon.png
Mods armor cover.png
Cover
Research:
16 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
24 000 Sl icon.png
540 Ge icon.png
Mods heli false thermal targets.png
Flares/Chaff
Research:
10 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
15 000 Sl icon.png
340 Ge icon.png
Mods ammo.png
M60_belt_pack
Research:
10 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
15 000 Sl icon.png
340 Ge icon.png
Mod arrow 1.png
Mods napalm fire bomb.png
BLU-27/B
Research:
10 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
15 000 Sl icon.png
340 Ge icon.png
Mods air to air missile.png
AIM-9L
Research:
10 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
15 000 Sl icon.png
340 Ge icon.png
Mod arrow 0.png
Mods g suit.png
G-suit
Research:
14 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
21 000 Sl icon.png
470 Ge icon.png
Mods pilon bomb.png
Mk82
Research:
14 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
21 000 Sl icon.png
470 Ge icon.png
Mod arrow 0.png
Mods air to air midrange missile.png
AIM-7M
Research:
14 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
21 000 Sl icon.png
470 Ge icon.png
Mod arrow 0.png
Mods weapon.png
M60_new_gun
Research:
16 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
24 000 Sl icon.png
540 Ge icon.png
Mods pilon bomb.png
Mk84
Research:
16 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
24 000 Sl icon.png
540 Ge icon.png
Mod arrow 0.png
Mods air to air missile.png
Python 3
Research:
16 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
24 000 Sl icon.png
540 Ge icon.png
Mod arrow 0.png
Mods jet engine extinguisher.png
EFS
Research:
26 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
40 000 Sl icon.png
880 Ge icon.png
Mods optical guided bomb.png
GBU-8
Research:
26 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
40 000 Sl icon.png
880 Ge icon.png
Mods air to air missile.png
AIM-9M
Research:
26 000 Rp icon.png
Cost:
40 000 Sl icon.png
880 Ge icon.png

Armaments

Ballistic Computer
CCIP (Guns) CCIP (Rockets) CCIP (Bombs) CCRP (Bombs) Lead indicator
alt={{{alt}}} alt={{{alt}}} alt={{{alt}}} alt={{{alt}}} alt={{{alt}}}

Offensive armament

Main article: M61A1 (20 mm)

The Baz is armed with:

  • 1 x 20 mm M61A1 cannon, wing root-mounted (940 rpg)
  • 240 x countermeasures

Suspended armament

The Baz can be outfitted with the following ordnance:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
Hardpoints F-15A.png
500 lb LDGP Mk 82 bombs 1, 6 1, 6 1, 6
500 lb Mk 82 Snakeye bombs 1, 6 1, 6 1, 6
2,000 lb GBU-8 bombs 1 1 1
2,000 lb LDGP Mk 84 bombs 1 1 1
BLU-27/B incendiary bombs 3 3 3
AIM-7M Sparrow missiles 1 1 1 1
AIM-9L Sidewinder missiles 1 1 1 1
AIM-9M Sidewinder missiles 1 1 1 1
Python 3 missiles 1 1 1 1
610 gal drop tanks 1* 1 1*
Maximum permissible loadout weight: 5,448 kg
Maximum permissible weight imbalance: 1,000 kg
* Wing-mounted drop tanks must be equipped together
Default weapon presets
  • 3 x 610 gal drop tanks
  • 2 x AIM-9L Sidewinder missiles
  • 4 x AIM-9L Sidewinder missiles
  • 4 x AIM-9M Sidewinder missiles
  • 4 x Python 3 missiles
  • 4 x AIM-7M Sparrow missiles
  • 18 x 500 lb LDGP Mk 82 bombs (9,000 lb total)
  • 18 x 500 lb Mk 82 Snakeye bombs (9,000 lb total)
  • 3 x 2,000 lb LDGP Mk 84 bombs (6,000 lb total)
  • 3 x 2,000 lb GBU-8 bombs (6,000 lb total)
  • 9 x BLU-27/B incendiary bombs

Usage in battles

Describe the tactics of playing in the aircraft, the features of using aircraft in a team and advice on tactics. Refrain from creating a "guide" - do not impose a single point of view, but instead, give the reader food for thought. Examine the most dangerous enemies and give recommendations on fighting them. If necessary, note the specifics of the game in different modes (AB, RB, SB).

Pros and cons

Summarise and briefly evaluate the vehicle in terms of its characteristics and combat effectiveness. Mark its pros and cons in the bulleted list. Try not to use more than 6 points for each of the characteristics. Avoid using categorical definitions such as "bad", "good" and the like - use substitutions with softer forms such as "inadequate" and "effective".

Pros:

Cons:

History

One of the contributing factors to Israel's swift and overwhelming victory in the Six-Day War of 1967 was its ability to achieve total air superiority at the very outset, partly due to its pre-emptive strike on its neighbours' air bases, but also thanks to the intensive training of its pilots and the superiority of French and American jet fighter technology at the time. However, the subsequent War of Attrition demonstrated that Israel's enemies — and the Soviet Union which supplied them — were determined to counter those advantages by any means necessary. During the War of Attrition, Egyptian and Syrian SAM capabilities became a serious headache for the Israeli Air Force (IAF), and the overwhelming mass of MiG and Sukhoi aircraft deployed by Egypt, Syria and the Soviet Union further countered Israel's advantages. To make matters worse, the new MiG-25 high-altitude, high-speed jet was now being used by Israel's enemies to perform recon missions over its territory, which the IAF repeatedly failed to intercept. These problems came to a head during the Yom Kippur War of 1973, when the IAF lost over a dozen aircraft to SAM interceptions alone, and failed repeatedly to secure air superiority over either of its belligerent neighbours.

Despite having only recently purchased a whole slew of F-4 Phantom IIs in the late 60s, and having recently begun producing its own Mirage variants (in the form of the Nesher), Israel was now forced to modernize its air force yet again to meet these new challenges. The obvious candidates for this modernization effort were the Grumman F-14 and McDonnell Douglas F-15, two of America's newest high-speed, twin-engine air superiority fighters. A committee established to review the two aircraft quickly determined that the F-15 would be the most suitable for Israel's particular needs. Israel was eager to receive the planes as soon as possible, but by 1976 they had barely just entered production to supply the U.S. Airforce. As a result, the Israelis agreed to take four of the existing pre-production planes as part of the first arms deal. Thus, in late 1976, Israel became the first country outside the United States to acquire the F-15. Notably, a delay in the arrival of these planes in Israel on a Friday, December 10, 1976 forced several of the Israeli ministers who had attended the ceremony to break the Sabbath (a mandatory religious day of rest). This resulted in outrage followed by the collapse of the Israeli government, causing a shift of power that has changed Israeli politics ever since.

The reporting name Baz ("Falcon") was assigned to all F-15 A/B/C/Ds purchased by Israel from 1976 all the way through to the 1990s, regardless of their specific models or configurations, making it more difficult to distinguish between various models. Nevertheless, the IAF has periodically modified older Baz F-15s to match the specifications of newer ones, making the distinction less relevant. The exact number of F-15s purchased from each model are also unclear. What is known is that Israel has purchased almost as many two-seater models (B and D) as single-seaters (A and C), with the two-seaters being used mostly for training purposes and recon missions.

Aside from the pre-production planes described earlier, most of the initial F-15As and Bs purchased by Israel were from Production Blocks 5 and 6. As with all fighters purchased by Israel since the 1960s, the Baz was outfitted with several Israeli-made electronic systems, and modified to accept Israeli-made aerial munitions such as the Python and Popeye. Overall, out of all modified Israeli aircraft, the Baz appears to be closest to the original American model. This changed in the late 1990s, when all Baz F-15s in the IAF were upgraded further to the BazMash standard (short for Baz Meshupar, lit. "improved Baz"), and became undeniably different from their American counterparts.

The F-15A was adopted very enthusiastically by Israeli pilots, and quickly became the dominant fighter in the IAF, providing an aerial umbrella that could not be matched by any of its neighbors. This coincided with the peace process between Israel and Egypt, which led to a 1979 treaty between the two countries that radically altered the balance of power in the Middle East. Nevertheless, the Syrian Air Force was not fully deterred, and continued engaging Israel in sporadic battles throughout the end of the 1970s and early 1980s, as the two nations struggled over Syria's increased control of Lebanon. As part of these skirmishes, in 1978 the F-15 scored its world-premier air kill when Israeli pilot Moshe Melnik downed a Syrian MiG-21. Another first for the F-15 and the military aviation world was also scored by a Baz, when one shot down a Syrian MiG-25 for the first time in history.

Baz F-15s continued seeing intense action in Israeli service over the next several years. With the introduction of the F-16 Netz as Israel's new fighter-bomber in 1980, these two American fighters allowed Israel to perform 'Operation Opera' in 1981: an attack on the Osiraq nuclear reactor near Baghdad, Iraq. Ten Baz F-15s provided cover for the operation, though no Iraqi aircraft were ultimately scrambled against them. The Baz F-15's most intense aerial engagement came one year afterwards, when Baz fighters served as the high-altitude interceptors in Operation Mole Cricket 19, a massive SEAD operation designed to destroy the entire Syrian air defense network along its border with Lebanon. With F-16s and F-4s provoking Syrian aircraft to scramble and engage, the F-15s would swoop down and eliminate them en-masse. During the battle, Israeli F-15s shot down a total of 38 enemy MiG-21s, MiG-23s and MiG-23Ms — nearly half the aircraft shot down during the three-day battle — while taking no losses of their own. Throughout the course of the First Lebanon War, Baz F-15s shot down a total of around 80 Syrian aircraft.

From 1976 onward, Israel continued purchasing F-15s of various models for almost twenty years. The last shipment (consisting of older F-15As) was greenlit by Washington thanks to Israel's begrudging agreement not to relatiate against Iraq during the 1991 Gulf War. These F-15As came from U.S. Airforce reserve stocks, and were used by the IAF mostly as spare parts for other planes. In 1995, Israel began upgrading its Baz F-15s to new specifications, with particular attention to all-weather capabilities, improved radar systems, GPS, and network connectivity. At the same time, Israel stopped purchasing any additional Baz F-15s, and switched entirely to the purchase of new F-15E Strike Eagles from a variant made specifically for their purposes: the F-15I Ra'am. Nevertheless, due to the prohibitive costs of F-15 purchases, and the central role this plane fills in Israel's aerial supremacy, The Baz continues to serve in the IAF to this day. It is unknown exactly how old the oldest Baz in service is currently, but it would have to be around 35-40 years old as of 2023, with significant improvements added over the years.


Media

Skins

See also

Related development

External links

Paste links to sources and external resources, such as:

  • topic on the official game forum;
  • other literature.


McDonnell Aircraft Corporation
Jet Fighters  F2H-2 · F3H-2
  F-4C Phantom II · F-4E Phantom II · F-4J Phantom II · F-4S Phantom II
  F-15A · F-15C MSIP II
Strike Aircraft  AV-8B Plus
Helicopters  AH-6M
Export/Licensed 
Aircraft  ◄F-4F Early · ◄F-4F · ◄F-4F KWS LV · Phantom FG.1 · Phantom FGR.2 · F-4J(UK) Phantom II · F-4EJ Phantom II · F-4EJ ADTW · Kurnass · Kurnass 2000
  F-15J · F-15J(M) · Baz · Baz Meshupar
  ▄AV-8B Plus
Helicopters  Lahatut
  The McDonnell Aircraft Corporation merged with Douglas Aircraft Company in 1967 to form McDonnell Douglas Corporation. Later it was merged with The Boeing Company in 1997.
See Also  Mitsubishi Heavy Industries

Israel jet aircraft
  Kfir Canard · Kfir C.2 · Kfir C.7 · Nesher
Britain 
Meteor  Meteor NF.13 · Meteor F.8
France 
Vautour  Vautour IIA · Vautour IIN
Super Mystere  Sambad · Sa'ar
Mirage III  Shahak
Other  M.D.450B Ouragan · Mystere IVA
USA 
F-84  F-84F
A-4  A-4H · A-4E Early (M) · A-4E · Ayit
F-4  Kurnass · Kurnass 2000
F-15  Baz · Baz Meshupar
F-16  Netz · Barak II