M4A5

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M4A5 Ram II
us_m4a5_ram_2.png
AB
RB
SB
General characteristics
Brief
Detailed
3.7/3.7/3.7BR
5 peopleCrew
Mobility
29.5 tWeight
5 forward
1 back
Gear box
Armament
57 mm 6pdr OQF Mk.III cannonWeapon 1
92 roundsAmmunition
-7° / 20°Vertical guidance
verticalStabilizer
1 480 roundsAmmunition
250 roundsBelt capacity
500 shots/minFire rate
2 960 roundsAmmunition
250 roundsBelt capacity
500 shots/minFire rate
Economy
1 150 Ge icon.pngPurchase
Sl icon.png2 930/2 350/1 640Repair
10 000 Sl icon.pngCrew training
80 000 Sl icon.pngExperts
270 Ge icon.pngAces
x 2.30 Rp icon.pngReward for battle
This page is about the American medium tank M4A5. For other uses of the designation, see M4 (Disambiguation).

Description

GarageImage M4A5.jpg


The M4A5 Ram II is a premium rank II American medium tank with a battle rating of 3.7 (AB/RB/SB). It was introduced in Update 1.61 "Road to Glory". The first Canadian tank added into War Thunder, the Ram II was an attempt by the Canadians to produce their own turreted tank with the M3 Medium chassis. The Ram can be called a "hybrid" between the M3 medium tanks and the M4 Sherman.

The M4A5 is quite a hybrid of a variety of traits among the British and American ground forces tree. The Ram is made up of the transmission, suspension, and engine from the American M3 Lee, the turreted platform of an M4 Sherman, and the 6-pounder gun from the British. Thus, in its place in Rank 2, the play style is akin to the M3 Lee's mobility with the power of a turreted tank. It should then be played like any standard American medium tank, with extra caution on the weak points presented on the front armour right next to the front machine gun turret.

General info

Survivability and armour

Armour type:

  • Cast homogenous armour
  • Rolled homogenous armour (Machine gun turret, Transmission, Lower side hull, Rear engine, Roof)
Armour Front (Slope angle) Sides Rear (Slope angle) Roof
Hull 88.9 mm (26-66°) Front glacis
50.8 mm (0-58°) Lower glacis
50.8 mm (12-87°) Driver's port
63.5 mm (0-67°) Upper
38.1 mm Lower
38.1 mm (0-64°) Top <br. 38.1 mm (0-52°) 38.1 mm
25.4 mm Engine deck
Turret 60.325 mm (22-26°) Turret front
69.85 (0-71°) + 38.1 mm Gun shield
44.45 + 63.5 mmGun mantlet
69.85 - 76.2 mm (0-70°) 69.85 mm (0-58°) 38.1 mm
Machine gun turret 63.5 + 50.8 mm 63.5 mm 63.5 mm 50.8 mm
Armour Sides Roof
Cupola 22.2 + 50.8 mm 25.4 mm

Notes:

  • Suspension wheels are 15 mm thick, bogies are 10 mm thick, and tracks are 17 mm thick.
  • 8 mm RHA plate separating the engine and crew compartment.

Mobility

Mobility characteristic
Weight (tons) Add-on Armor
weight (tons)
Max speed (km/h)
29.5 N/A 44 (AB)
40 (RB/SB)
Engine power (horsepower)
Mode Stock Upgraded
Arcade 620 763
Realistic/Simulator 354 400
Power-to-weight ratio (hp/ton)
Mode Stock Upgraded
Arcade 21.02 25.86
Realistic/Simulator 12.00 13.56

Armaments

Main armament

57 mm OQF 6-pounder Mk.III
Capacity Vertical
guidance
Horizontal
guidance
Stabilizer
92 -7.5°/+20° ±180° Vertical
Turret rotation speed (°/s)
Mode Stock Upgraded Prior + Full crew Prior + Expert qualif. Prior + Ace qualif.
Arcade 11.9 16.5 20.0 22.1 23.5
Realistic 11.9 14.0 17.0 18.8 20.0
Reloading rate (seconds)
Stock Prior + Full crew Prior + Expert qualif. Prior + Ace qualif.
5.20 4.60 4.24 4.00
Ammunition
Penetration statistics
Ammunition Type of
warhead
Penetration in mm @ 90°
10m 100m 500m 1000m 1500m 2000m
Shot Mk.5 AP 101 100 83 67 51 45
Shell Mk.10 HE 9 9 9 9 9 9
Shot Mk.5 HV AP 112 111 92 74 57 50
Shot Mk.8 APC 94 92 83 72 63 52
Shot Mk.9 APCBC 113 112 100 90 84 80
Shell details
Ammunition Type of
warhead
Velocity
in m/s
Projectile
Mass in kg
Fuse delay

in m:

Fuse sensitivity

in mm:

Explosive Mass in g
(TNT equivalent):
Normalization At 30°
from horizontal:
Ricochet:
0% 50% 100%
Shot Mk.5 AP 807 2.8 N/A N/A N/A -1° 47° 60° 65°
Shell Mk.10 HE 655 2.7 0.1 0.1 590 +0° 79° 80° 81°
Shot Mk.5 HV AP 853 2.8 N/A N/A N/A -1° 47° 60° 65°
Shot Mk.8 APC 853 2.9 N/A N/A N/A +4° 48° 63° 71°
Shot Mk.9 APCBC 801 3.2 N/A N/A N/A +4° 48° 63° 71°
Ammo racks
Ammo racks of the M4A5 Ram II.
Full
ammo
1st
rack empty
2nd
rack empty
3rd
rack empty
4th
rack empty
5th
rack empty
6th
rack empty
Visual
discrepancy
92 XX (X+)  (+)  (+)  (+)  (+)  (+) no

Machine guns

Main article: Browning (7.62 mm)
7.62 mm M1919A4
Coaxial mount
Capacity (Belt capacity) Fire rate
(shots/minute)
Vertical
guidance
Horizontal
guidance
1,480 (250) 500 N/A N/A
Pintle mount
Capacity (Belt capacity) Fire rate
(shots/minute)
Vertical
guidance
Horizontal
guidance
1,480 (250) 500 -10°/+70° ±60°
Hull turret
Capacity (Belt capacity) Fire rate
(shots/minute)
Vertical
guidance
Horizontal
guidance
1,480 (250) 500 -8°/+60° -120°/+50°

Usage in battles

Describe the tactics of playing in the vehicle, the features of using vehicles in the team and advice on tactics. Refrain from creating a "guide" - do not impose a single point of view but instead give the reader food for thought. Describe the most dangerous enemies and give recommendations on fighting them. If necessary, note the specifics of the game in different modes (AB, RB, SB).

Modules

Tier Mobility Protection Firepower
I Tracks Parts Horizontal Drive Shot Mk.5 HV
II Suspension Brake System FPE Shot Mk.8 Adjustment of Fire
III Filters Crew Replenishment Shot Mk.9 Elevation Mechanism
IV Transmission Engine Artillery Support

Pros and cons

Pros:

  • Strong frontal armour, especially the upper glacis, 100+ mm of effective thickness
  • Well armoured at the rank
  • Lots of camouflages to unlock
  • 63.5 mm of side armour, works well when angled
  • 57 mm gun that can handle every foe it encounters
  • Has .30 cal anti-aircraft defence
  • Somehow adequate top armour
  • Great mobility
  • One of the few tanks that has all it's machine guns modeled and working properly
  • Relatively cheap in GE price
  • Relatively easy to play in matches
  • Extremely good at taking hits and creating distractions
  • Very hard for contemporary enemy tanks to knock it out in one hit
  • This tank will feel like home for M4A3E2 Jumbo players because of its similar play style
  • Fast firing main gun (4 second completely aced out reload)

Cons:

  • Front armour has some weak spots due to unusual slopes
  • Driver hatch is a prominent weak point on front armour
  • Armour protecting the transmission is only 50.8 mm thick
  • Only the upper hull sides are 63.5 mm thick, the lower part is still only 38.1 mm
  • Gun mantlet has an average thickness
  • 57 mm gun lacks explosive filler
  • Reverse speed is bad
  • Very cramped turret, a single shot will likely disable all 3 crew members
  • Most ammo racks are located below the turret and underneath the upper hull where it's only protected by 38.1 mm unangled armour
  • Unlike the usual Shermans with top-mounted .50 cal, this only has .30 cal

History

Development

The aftermath of the Battle of France left the British military decimated as most of their equipment had to be left behind in their withdrawal at Dunkirk. Desperate for military equipment, especially tanks, they requested from the U.S. to help produce the necessary vehicles to supplement the armoured forces. Another firm assisting the British in armoured productions was Canada via the Canadian Pacific Railway’s Angus Shops with a contract to build 300 Valentine tanks. Later, Canada themselves ordered 488 Valentines to build up their own tank forces, but realize that they need a cruiser tank to attack and exploit breakthroughs. Complications between adapting British designs to North American standards and the difference in material quality cause the Canadians to seek an American-derived cruiser tank rather than a British design.

The current standard U.S. Tank at the time was the interim design M3 Lee. With the 75 mm gun on a sponson rather than its own turret, the M3 Medium tank currently isn’t a suitable candidate as the standard cruiser tank. In 1941, the Canadian Interdepartmental Tank Committee decided to use the M3 chassis as a foundation for a new and better, locally-produced design. The British took interest on this redesigning of the M3 Medium tank and sent a tank expert L.E.Carr to assist in the designing of the hull and turret. The hull itself was to be cast and the turret was designed around the expectations to mount the 6-pounder or the 75 mm gun. The name for the design was the Ram. The US would designate the Canadian models as the M4A5

Throughout the Ram’s designing and testings, the Canadians ran into problems of inexperience around building a tank and lacking the necessary production lines to begin producing tank parts. Deriving the Ram off the M3 Medium required parts like the transmission and engine that were currently being produced in America, which were always in low numbers given American tank production at the time. America assisted in the production of the Ram by producing the pilot models and the Canadian Tank Arsenal was to be built by Montreal Locomotive Works, themselves a subsidiary of the American Locomotive Company who had experience building M3 tanks for the Americans.

The first prototype was produced in June 1941 and featured a full 360 traversable turret with a cast steel body, featuring the same powertrain and engine as the M3 it was derived from. The Ram was also adapted for British specifications with adaption to a right-hand drive and weaponry. Overall the Ram was also shorter than the M3. It also featured the side doors and a machine gun turret on the front, but these were later removed in later productions. Production for the Ram started in November. Though intended to be fitted with the 6-pounder, the first 50 Rams produced used a 2-pounder due to lack of guns or mounts available for the Canadians. These were labelled Ram Mk.I. By February 1942, the Ram design switched back to the 6-pounder, which was designated the Ram Mk.II, which production continued until July 1943. During that time span, about 2,032 Rams and its variants were produced.

Combat history

Unfortunately, around the time the Ram became battle-worthy for the front-lines, the Americans started their mass-production of the M4 Shermans. The M4 Sherman was by all mean similar in automotive performances but benefited by the mass-production of the American industry. The Sherman quickly made the Ram, which only saving grace was giving the M3 Medium a turret, unnecessary. In March 1942, the Canadian government made the decision to switch all production lines to produce the M4A1, with the Ram production only continuing until the proper machinery was ready, which then the Ram design remained idle. The Ram never saw combat usage and was only used as a training vehicle in Britain until mid-1944.

The Ram never saw combat as a tank, but its variants had a better record. Many Ram tanks were converted into armoured personnel carriers known as the Kangaroo, flamethrower vehicles known as the Badger, artillery observation vehicles, ammunition carriers, armoured recovery vehicles, and anti-tank gun tractor. Its most combat-oriented variant was the Sexton self-propelled gun with the 25-pounder howitzer developed to support the infantry, though the Sexton was also produced by the chassis from the Grizzly design.

After World War II, the Netherlands were free to take possession of any Ram tanks in army dumps on their territory. The Dutch used these tanks to equip their first tank units, the 1st and 2nd Tank Battalions. The Rams were in a poor state from low maintenance and disuse so they received additional Rams from Britain in slightly better conditions in 1947. By 1950, most of the Rams were broken down and only 50 were available for use between the two battalions. They were all replaced, along with Shermans in their inventory, by the Centurion tank in 1952, supplied by the Americans. The Rams only usage past that was as static pillboxes on the IJssel line facing the Soviets in the Cold War.

Legacy

The Ram, unfortunately, went down in history as one of Canada’s war design failures, with the M4 Sherman being produced in parallel by the U.S. overtaking it. It is also a testament to the disparity in the industrial base between the two countries. The Ram could still be attributed to kick-starting Canadian production lines to be able to produce the M4A1 Shermans, which were designated the Grizzly.

About 6 Ram tanks still survive today, with only 3 being the original tank design.

Media

Excellent additions to the article would be video guides, screenshots from the game, and photos.

See also

Links to the articles on the War Thunder Wiki that you think will be useful for the reader, for example:

  • reference to the series of the vehicles;
  • links to approximate analogues of other nations and research trees.

External links


USA medium tanks
Early projects  Medium Tank M2
M3  M3 Lee · Grant I · M4A5
M4  M4 · Calliope · M4A1 · M4A1 (76) W · M4A2 · M4A2 (76) W · M4A3 (105) · M4A3 (76) W
M26  T20 · T25 · M26 · M26 T99 · M26E1
Post-war  M46 · M46 "Tiger" · M47 · M48A1 · T95E1 · ADATS
MBT  M60 · M60A1 (AOS) · M60A1 RISE (P) · M60A2 · MBT-70 · XM-803 · XM-1 (GM) · XM-1 (Chrysler) · M1 Abrams · IPM1 · M1A1 Abrams
Israeli  Magach 3 · Merkava Mk.1

USA premium ground vehicles
Light tanks  Light Tank M2A4 (1st Arm.Div.) · Light Tank M3A1 Stuart (USMC) · Light Armored Car M8 · M5A1 Stuart (5th Canadian Armored Division) · T18E2 "Boarhound"
Medium tanks  Cruiser Tank Grant I · M4A5 Ram II · Rocket Launcher T34 Calliope · T20 · Medium Tank M26 T99 · Medium Tank M26E1 · Medium Tank M46 Patton (73 Tank Batalion) · Magach 3 · Tank, Combat, Full-Tracked, 105-mm Gun XM-1 (GM) · Tank, Combat, Full-Tracked, 105-mm Gun XM-1 (Chrysler) · T54E1
Heavy tanks  Assault Tank T14 · Assault Tank M4A3E2 Jumbo "Cobra King" · Heavy Tank T29 · Heavy Tank T30
Tank destroyers  75 mm Gun Motor Carriage M8 · M18 Gun Motor Carriage "Black Cat" · M18 90-mm Gun Motor Carriage · Super Heavy Tank T28 · T114